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The Southern Poverty Law Center said Thursday that it had fired the organization's co-founder, civil rights attorney Morris Dees. He is seen here in 2016. Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images

First responders walk through a neighborhood heavily damaged by a tornado the day before in Beauregard, Ala., on Monday. The death toll from the storm stands at 23, with victims ranging in age from 6 to 93. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

Hassan Shibly, attorney for the family of Hoda Muthana, says she was a "vulnerable young woman who was brainwashed and manipulated." Chris O'Meara/AP hide caption

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Chris O'Meara/AP

This file photo shows Alabama's lethal injection chamber at Holman Correctional Facility in Atmore, Ala. Inmate Domineque Ray was put to death Thursday night without his spiritual adviser present in the chamber. DAVE MARTIN/AP hide caption

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DAVE MARTIN/AP

'Never Heard Nothing Like It': Southern Storm Wrecks Landmark Churches

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Emantic Bradford Sr. (left) discusses the results of a forensic examination on his son, EJ, who was fatally shot by police on Thanksgiving. Flanked by attorney Ben Crump, the elder Bradford addressed a news conference Monday in Birmingham, Ala. Jay Reeves/AP hide caption

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Jay Reeves/AP

Jennifer Sumner and her son, Kaysen Ford, embrace at their StoryCorps interview in 2015 in Birmingham, Ala. Christina Stanton/ StoryCorps hide caption

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Christina Stanton/ StoryCorps

Transgender Boy Tells Mom 'It Shouldn't Be Scary To Be Who You Are'

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State representatives work in the house chambers at the State House in Montgomery, Ala. A federal appeals court sided with workers from Birmingham, Ala., who argued that state lawmakers racially discriminated against the majority-black city by blocking a minimum wage hike. Brynn Anderson/AP hide caption

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Brynn Anderson/AP

In Battle Pitting Cities Vs. States Over Minimum Wage, Birmingham Scores A Win

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