Alabama Alabama

Every spring, local residents have staged a play based on To Kill a Mockingbird in this courthouse in Monroeville, Ala. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

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Debbie Elliott/NPR

A Town Divided Over The Next Chapter Of An Iconic Harper Lee Book

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Regatta participant Robert Luiten of Mobile, Ala., right, rejoices on learning that his son, Leonard Luiten, was found after their boat capsized in a storm on Saturday, in Dauphin Island, Ala. The Coast Guard is still searching for five missing sailors. Mike Kittrell/AL.COM/Landov hide caption

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Mike Kittrell/AL.COM/Landov

Fresh oil puddles on the white sand in Orange Beach, Ala., during the BP oil spill in 2010. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

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Debbie Elliott/NPR

5 Years After BP Oil Spill, Experts Debate Damage To Ecosystem

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A photo made available by the Alabama Department of Corrections shows Anthony Ray Hinton. Hinton, who spent nearly 30 years on death row, will go free Friday, after prosecutors told a court that there is not enough evidence to link him to the 1985 murders he was convicted of committing. AP hide caption

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Maranda Brooks stands in January outside a payday loans business that she used to frequent. Troubled by consumer complaints and loopholes in state laws, federal regulators are proposing expansive, first-ever rules on payday lenders, aimed at helping cash-strapped borrowers from falling into a cycle of debt. Tony Dejak/AP hide caption

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Tony Dejak/AP

Payday Loans — And Endless Cycles Of Debt — Targeted By Federal Watchdog

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In this Sunday, Jan. 18, 2015, photo, marchers hold up cellular phones to record the rapper Common and singer-songwriter John Legend performing at the foot of the Edmund Pettus Bridge. Brynn Anderson/AP hide caption

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Brynn Anderson/AP

The Racist History Behind The Iconic Selma Bridge

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Tori Sisson, left, and Shante Wolfe, right, exchange wedding rings during their ceremony, Feb. 9, 2015, in Montgomery, Ala. They were the first couple to file their marriage license in Montgomery County. Such marriage licenses appear to be on hold again following a state Supreme Court ruling on Tuesday. Brynn Anderson/AP hide caption

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Brynn Anderson/AP

Sureshbhai Patel lies in a bed at Huntsville Hospital in Huntsville, Ala., on Feb. 7. Patel was severely injured when police threw him to the ground. Chirag Patel/AP hide caption

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Chirag Patel/AP

Ala. Governor Apologizes To Indian Government In 'Excessive Force' Case

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Chirag Patel stands in his neighborhood in Madison, Ala., where his father, Sureshbhai Patel, was severely injured by police. Visiting from India, the elder Patel was staying with his son, his wife and child in their Madison home. Sarah Cole/AL.COM /Landov hide caption

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Sarah Cole/AL.COM /Landov

The Rev. Charles Perry of Unity Church, in Birmingham, Ala., marries Curtis Stephens, center, and his partner of 30 years, Pat Helms, Monday at the Jefferson County Courthouse. Alabama began issuing marriage licenses to same-sex couples Monday after the U.S. Supreme Court refused to block the marriages in the state. Hal Yeager/AP hide caption

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Hal Yeager/AP

Supreme Court Won't Stop Gay Marriages In Alabama

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