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Marshae Jones, whose fetus died after she was shot in a fight, was indicted while the woman accused of shooting her has been freed. The Jefferson County, Ala., prosecutor is considering whether to prosecute her. Jefferson County Sheriff's Office/AP hide caption

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Jefferson County Sheriff's Office/AP

The Supreme Court has long upheld the right of access to a wide range of judicial proceedings and records. An order Monday unsealing records in an Alabama death penalty case continued that tradition. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

The Supreme Court has sealed documents related to a death penalty case in Alabama, an unusual step for the court. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Supreme Court Pressed For Sealed Documents In Death Penalty Case

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University of Alabama employees remove the name of Hugh F. Culverhouse Jr. from its law school's sign in Tuscaloosa, Ala., Friday, after the board of trustees voted to return $21.5 million to longtime donor Hugh F. Culverhouse Jr. Blake Paterson/AP hide caption

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Blake Paterson/AP

T.K. Thorne says the $20 monthly solar fee she pays to Alabama Power will double the time it will take to pay off her rooftop solar system. Julia Simon for NPR hide caption

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Julia Simon for NPR

To Some Solar Users, Power Company Fees Are An Unfair Charge

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The Alabama Senate postponed a vote on a highly restrictive abortion bill after controversy over an amendment that would provide an exception in cases of rape or incest. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Prisoners stand in a crowded lunch line at Elmore Correctional Facility in Elmore, Ala. in June 2015. On Saturday, a U.S. District Court Judge determined the state's Department of Corrections had not adequately addressed a spike in prisoner suicides. Brynn Anderson/AP hide caption

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Brynn Anderson/AP

Prisoners stand in a crowded lunch line during a prison tour at Elmore Correctional Facility in Elmore, Ala. A Department of Justice report finds violence in Alabama's overcrowded prisons is 'cruel' and 'pervasive.' Brynn Anderson/AP hide caption

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Brynn Anderson/AP

Justice Dept. Finds Violence In Alabama Prisons 'Common, Cruel, Pervasive'

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The Southern Poverty Law Center said Thursday that it had fired the organization's co-founder, civil rights attorney Morris Dees. He is seen here in 2016. Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images

First responders walk through a neighborhood heavily damaged by a tornado the day before in Beauregard, Ala., on Monday. The death toll from the storm stands at 23, with victims ranging in age from 6 to 93. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

Hassan Shibly, attorney for the family of Hoda Muthana, says she was a "vulnerable young woman who was brainwashed and manipulated." Chris O'Meara/AP hide caption

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Chris O'Meara/AP