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Christopher McNair, center left, and Maxine McNair, right, parents of Denise McNair, one of four African American girls who died in a church bombing in Birmingham, Ala., on Sept. 15, 1963, are shown here at a news conference in New York later that month. Maxine McNair, the last living parent of any of the children killed in the bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church, died on Sunday at 93. AP hide caption

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AP

Patti Herring sobs as she sorts through the remains of her home in Fultondale, Ala., on Tuesday, after her house was destroyed by a tornado. Jay Reeves/AP hide caption

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Jay Reeves/AP

Sloss Furnace in Birmingham, Ala., produced iron for decades. The site closed in the 1970s and is now a national historic landmark. Nicolas Henderson/Flickr hide caption

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Nicolas Henderson/Flickr

Concerned Workers Face Dwindling Industry And Layoffs With A Steely Resolve

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Gwen Moten remembers her childhood friend, Denise McNair, who died with three other girls in the 16th Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, Ala., in 1963. StoryCorps hide caption

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StoryCorps

Charleston Stirs Memories Of Young Birmingham Bombing Victim

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The Congressional Gold Medal has been posthumously awarded to four girls killed in the 1963 bombing of Birmingham's 16th Street Baptist Church. President Obama signed the legislation Friday, as (from left) Birmingham Mayor William Bell, Dr. Sharon Malone Holder, Attorney General Eric Holder, Rep. Terri Sewell, and relatives of Denise McNair and Carole Robertson look on. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

Residents survey the destruction after a tornado hit Pratt City, Ala. just north of downtown Birmingham, Ala. on Wednesday, April 27, 2011. Butch Dill/AP hide caption

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Butch Dill/AP

Steve Inskeep speaks with Birmingham Mayor William Bell

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