FEMA FEMA

An official with the Federal Emergency Management Agency talks to people at Houston's George R. Brown Convention Center, which has been a shelter for evacuees from Hurricane Harvey, on Sept. 2. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

With Harvey And Now Irma, Federal Funds And FEMA Are Put To The Test

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Larry Koser Jr. (left) and his son, Matthew, look for important papers and heirlooms inside his house after it was flooded by heavy rains from Hurricane Harvey. Erich Schlegel/Getty Images hide caption

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Erich Schlegel/Getty Images

Insurers Gear Up For Deluge Of Claims, Hope To Avoid Sandy Repeat

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Workers begin repairs to a wall that was lost in the wake of Hurricane Harvey on Wednesday in Rockport, Texas. Most insurance policies don't cover flooding damage. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

In Storm-Tossed Houston Area, Most Homeowners Lack Flood Insurance

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President Trump speaks during a visit to Federal Emergency Management Agency headquarters in Washington, D.C., on Aug. 4. Michael Reynolds/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Reynolds/Getty Images

Hurricanes in 2012 and 2003 submerged parking lots and park benches, and flooded businesses along Annapolis' Dock Street. City planners estimate that, given the rise in sea level, by 2100 the flood from a once-in-a-hundred-year storm would be almost twice as high as it would be if such a storm hit today. Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Mapping Coastal Flood Risk Lags Behind Sea Level Rise

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Floodwaters from Hurricane Katrina cover streets on Aug. 30, 2005, in New Orleans. Vincent Laforet/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Vincent Laforet/AFP/Getty Images

New Maps Label Much Of New Orleans Out Of Flood Hazard Area

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Louisiana resident David Key rides away after reviewing the damage to his home. Federal officials have expanded a disaster declaration after flooding in the state damaged tens of thousands of homes and left nine people dead. Max Becherer/AP hide caption

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Max Becherer/AP

Shane Altzier sweeps out the mud from the utilities office in Rainelle, W.Va., one of the towns hardest hit by floods that tore through the state on Friday. More rain this week has slowed cleanup efforts. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

Some homes have fallen into disrepair in the Midland Beach neighborhood in Staten Island, N.Y. Almost four years since the destruction caused by Hurricane Sandy, many on Staten Island are still dealing with the storm's consequences. Bryan Thomas for NPR hide caption

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Bryan Thomas for NPR

Lawmakers To FEMA: Flood Plan Overhaul Is 'Too Little, Too Late'

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A swing set is all that remains in the backyard of a house in Middletown, Calif., after a devastating wildfire. Birth certificates and marriage licenses were among the important things destroyed. Lesley McClurg/Capital Public Radio hide caption

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Lesley McClurg/Capital Public Radio

Proof Of Citizenship Up In Flames After California Wildfires

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Kelly O'Keefe is usually volunteering to help others. Now she's accepting help from strangers after her home was destroyed by floods. "It's really difficult to be the one with my hand out," she says. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

Wimberley Residents Leery Of River Weeks After Devastating Floods

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Doug Quinn's ranch house in Toms River, N.J., was heavily damaged by flooding during Hurricane Sandy. His insurance company gave him half the value of his home and when he appealed, FEMA sided with the insurance company. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

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Hansi Lo Wang/NPR

FEMA's Appeals Process Favored Insurance Companies Almost Every Time

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A worker shovels muck out of a home in Longport, N.J., after Superstorm Sandy in 2012. Federal regulators say homeowners will be able to challenge insurance payouts they believe shortchanged them. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Feds Prepared To Reopen All Superstorm Sandy Insurance Claims

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Kathy Hanlon and her sons, Sergio (left) and Cristian, were traumatized by Superstorm Sandy. Hanlon says her flood insurance company made life after Sandy even more horrible Charles Lane/NPR hide caption

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Charles Lane/NPR

Superstorm Sandy Victims Say FEMA's Role Is Fatally Conflicted

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Dan and Eileen Stapleton in front of their post-Sandy home in Long Beach, N.Y. They say it would cost taxpayers less if insurance just settled their claim. Charles Lane/WSHU hide caption

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Charles Lane/WSHU

After Sandy: Insurance Claim Battles Cost Homeowners, Taxpayers

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Artists' renderings of New Meadowland show how the wetland would be designed for human recreational use as well as flood control. The berm shown would be a path through the park when water was low (left). When storms came in, the wetlands would flood, and the berm would protect local development. Courtesy of New Meadowlands hide caption

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Courtesy of New Meadowlands

N.J. Braces For Future Disasters By Fleeing, And Fortifying, The Coast

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