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People are living in homes where roofs, windows, even walls are missing, using blue tarps to keep the elements at bay. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

Virgin Islands Still Recovering From 2017 Hurricanes As New Season Begins

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A worker from the Cobra Energy Company, contracted by the Army Corps of Engineers, installs power lines in the Barrio Martorel area of Yabucoa, a town where many residents continue without power in Puerto Rico, on May 16. Carlos Giusti/AP hide caption

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Carlos Giusti/AP

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott announced more than $500 million in hazard mitigation funding provided by FEMA is available immediately. He expects the state to receive at least $1.1 billion in aid by August. David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

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David J. Phillip/AP

Honolulu attorney Michael Green, right, sits with his client, the former Hawaii Emergency Management Agency employee who sent a false missile alert to residents and visitors in Hawaii, left, during an interview with reporters on Feb. 2, 2018 in Honolulu. The ex-state employee says he's devastated about causing panic, but he believed it was a real attack at the time. Jennifer Sinco Kelleher/AP hide caption

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Jennifer Sinco Kelleher/AP

Who Should Warn The Public Of Nuclear War?

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Army reservist Eric Elder, a lineman in civilian life, works with the Corps of Engineers to restore power in the hilly Rio Grande neighborhood east of San Juan. Marisa Peñaloza /NPR hide caption

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Marisa Peñaloza /NPR

Roberto Fret, 54, stands in the backyard of his damaged home. Hurricane Maria blew the roof off the house; the wind was so powerful that it twisted the metal roofing material and scattered pieces of it all over the yard. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

Thousands Of Puerto Ricans Are Still In Shelters. Now What?

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Whitefish Energy workers restore damaged lines in Barceloneta, Puerto Rico, on Oct. 15. A $300 million contract between the tiny company and Puerto Rico's electric authority has come under intense scrutiny. Ramon Espinosa/AP hide caption

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Ramon Espinosa/AP

Crowley shipping containers with running refrigeration systems are lined up at in the port of San Juan, Puerto Rico. They've been there for days, goods locked away inside. Angel Valentin for NPR hide caption

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Angel Valentin for NPR

In Puerto Rico, Containers Full Of Goods Sit Undistributed At Ports

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An official with the Federal Emergency Management Agency talks to people at Houston's George R. Brown Convention Center, which has been a shelter for evacuees from Hurricane Harvey, on Sept. 2. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

With Harvey And Now Irma, Federal Funds And FEMA Are Put To The Test

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Larry Koser Jr. (left) and his son, Matthew, look for important papers and heirlooms inside his house after it was flooded by heavy rains from Hurricane Harvey. Erich Schlegel/Getty Images hide caption

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Erich Schlegel/Getty Images

Insurers Gear Up For Deluge Of Claims, Hope To Avoid Sandy Repeat

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Workers begin repairs to a wall that was lost in the wake of Hurricane Harvey on Wednesday in Rockport, Texas. Most insurance policies don't cover flooding damage. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

In Storm-Tossed Houston Area, Most Homeowners Lack Flood Insurance

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President Trump speaks during a visit to Federal Emergency Management Agency headquarters in Washington, D.C., on Aug. 4. Michael Reynolds/Getty Images hide caption

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Hurricanes in 2012 and 2003 submerged parking lots and park benches, and flooded businesses along Annapolis' Dock Street. City planners estimate that, given the rise in sea level, by 2100 the flood from a once-in-a-hundred-year storm would be almost twice as high as it would be if such a storm hit today. Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Mapping Coastal Flood Risk Lags Behind Sea Level Rise

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Floodwaters from Hurricane Katrina cover streets on Aug. 30, 2005, in New Orleans. Vincent Laforet/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Vincent Laforet/AFP/Getty Images

New Maps Label Much Of New Orleans Out Of Flood Hazard Area

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Louisiana resident David Key rides away after reviewing the damage to his home. Federal officials have expanded a disaster declaration after flooding in the state damaged tens of thousands of homes and left nine people dead. Max Becherer/AP hide caption

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Max Becherer/AP