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In early October, Hurricane Michael devastated Florida's Panhandle, leaving beachside communities in ruins. The cost of removing debris from Mexico Beach, including its canals, is expected to top $25 million. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

'Struggling Here With Just Living' In The Aftermath Of Hurricane Michael

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A bridge damaged by Hurricane Michael can be seen Friday in Mexico Beach, Fla. The most powerful hurricane ever known to have hit the Florida Panhandle has left transportation and communication infrastructure in shambles, slowing relief efforts. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

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Gerald Herbert/AP

People with cellphones will receive a message like this one on Wednesday. FEMA hide caption

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FEMA

This Is Only A Test: Why Your Cellphone Buzzed Wednesday Afternoon

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John Gallagher in his truck in Fayetteville, N.C. "We've just been taking dispatch calls for swift water rescues, rescuing animals, missing persons," Gallagher said. Maddalena Richards/NPR hide caption

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Maddalena Richards/NPR

The Cajun Navy: Heroes Or Hindrances In Hurricanes?

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Members of the FEMA Urban Search and Rescue Task Force 4 search a flooded neighborhood for people who may have been trapped by the rising floodwaters during now-tropical storm Florence in North Carolina. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

President Trump, Vice President Pence and first lady Melania Trump visit the Federal Emergency Management Agency headquarters in Washington, D.C., on June 6. Secretary of Homeland Security Kirstjen Nielsen and FEMA Administrator Brock Long are seated at right. This summer, DHS transferred nearly $10 million from FEMA to immigration authorities, according to a congressional document. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

In this June 13 photo, a residence in the Figueroa neighborhood stands destroyed nine months after Hurricane Maria, in San Juan, Puerto Rico. On Wednesday a federal judge extended a temporary housing program for territory residents whose homes were destroyed. Carlos Giusti/AP hide caption

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Carlos Giusti/AP

U.S. Army soldiers pass out water, provided by FEMA, to residents in a neighborhood without grid electricity or running water in San Isidro, Puerto Rico, on Oct. 17, 2017. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Puerto Rican residents received food and water from FEMA after Hurricane Maria, but many complained that some boxes were stuffed with candy and salty snacks, not meals. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Puerto Rican Nerybelle Perez poses with a portrait of her father, World War II veteran Efrain Perez, who died after his ambulance was turned away from the island's largest public hospital when it had no electricity or water following Hurricane Maria. Carlos Giusti/AP hide caption

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Carlos Giusti/AP

People are living in homes where roofs, windows, even walls are missing, using blue tarps to keep the elements at bay. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

Virgin Islands Still Recovering From 2017 Hurricanes As New Season Begins

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A worker from the Cobra Energy Company, contracted by the Army Corps of Engineers, installs power lines in the Barrio Martorel area of Yabucoa, a town where many residents continue without power in Puerto Rico, on May 16. Carlos Giusti/AP hide caption

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Carlos Giusti/AP

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott announced more than $500 million in hazard mitigation funding provided by FEMA is available immediately. He expects the state to receive at least $1.1 billion in aid by August. David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

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David J. Phillip/AP

Honolulu attorney Michael Green, right, sits with his client, the former Hawaii Emergency Management Agency employee who sent a false missile alert to residents and visitors in Hawaii, left, during an interview with reporters on Feb. 2, 2018 in Honolulu. The ex-state employee says he's devastated about causing panic, but he believed it was a real attack at the time. Jennifer Sinco Kelleher/AP hide caption

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Jennifer Sinco Kelleher/AP

Who Should Warn The Public Of Nuclear War?

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Army reservist Eric Elder, a lineman in civilian life, works with the Corps of Engineers to restore power in the hilly Rio Grande neighborhood east of San Juan. Marisa Peñaloza /NPR hide caption

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Marisa Peñaloza /NPR

Roberto Fret, 54, stands in the backyard of his damaged home. Hurricane Maria blew the roof off the house; the wind was so powerful that it twisted the metal roofing material and scattered pieces of it all over the yard. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

Thousands Of Puerto Ricans Are Still In Shelters. Now What?

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Whitefish Energy workers restore damaged lines in Barceloneta, Puerto Rico, on Oct. 15. A $300 million contract between the tiny company and Puerto Rico's electric authority has come under intense scrutiny. Ramon Espinosa/AP hide caption

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Ramon Espinosa/AP