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Trust In Scientists Is Rising, Poll Finds

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Statisticians say it may not be wise to put all your eggs in the significance basket. intraprese/Getty Images hide caption

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intraprese/Getty Images

Statisticians' Call To Arms: Reject Significance And Embrace Uncertainty!

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Shoppers say they want simpler information to help them figure out which foods are healthy. But a one-size-fits-all solution may not work. asiseeit/Getty Images hide caption

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asiseeit/Getty Images

A farmer in India piles millet in a field. Grains such as millet and sorghum pack a powerful nutritional punch, but they are overlooked for calorie-laden commodity crops such as wheat or maize. Sam Panthaky/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sam Panthaky/AFP/Getty Images

Hundreds of people took part in Washington, D.C.'s "Grocery Walk" to demonstrate the difficulty of getting fresh food in some areas. Brian Oh /Courtesy of DC Greens hide caption

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Brian Oh /Courtesy of DC Greens

The foods on the left contain naturally occurring fibers that are intrinsic in plants. The foods on the right contain isolated fibers, such as chicory root, which are extracted and added to processed foods. The FDA will determine whether added fibers can count as dietary fiber on nutrition facts labels. Carolyn Rogers/NPR hide caption

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Carolyn Rogers/NPR

The FDA Will Decide Whether 26 Ingredients Count As Fiber

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Michael Jacobson (right) and Bonnie Liebman, CSPI's director of nutrition, launching a campaign against over-salted food in the late 1970s. Courtesy of Center for Science in the Public Interest hide caption

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Courtesy of Center for Science in the Public Interest

A Pioneer Of Food Activism Steps Down, Looks Back

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Indian female farmers sow paddy in a field during monsoon season near Allahabad on July 19, 2014. The monsoon rains, which usually hit India from June to September, are crucial for farmers whose crops feed hundreds of millions of people. Sanjay Kanojia/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sanjay Kanojia/AFP/Getty Images

A field near harvest time at Meyers Farm in Bethel, Alaska, can now grow crops like cabbage outside in the ground, due to rising temperatures. Daysha Eaton/KYUK hide caption

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Daysha Eaton/KYUK

Rising Temperatures Kick-Start Subarctic Farming In Alaska

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