exercise exercise
Stories About

exercise

Winter swimmers enjoyed an icy dip in Poland's Garczyn lake last February. Recorded air temperature was around 14 degrees Farenheit, and a large ice hole had to be cut to allow the lake bathing. NurPhoto/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
NurPhoto/Getty Images

The NPR staff likes to exercise in several different ways. Cameron Pollack/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Cameron Pollack/NPR

The people who got caught up in the exercise boom of the 1970s and stuck with it into their senior years now have significantly healthier hearts and muscles than their sedentary counterparts. David Trood/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
David Trood/Getty Images

Exercise Wins: Fit Seniors Can Have Hearts That Look 30 Years Younger

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/674380082/675210469" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Getting physical activity every day can help maintain health throughout your life. Ronnie Kaufman/Larry Hirshowitz/Getty Images/Blend Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ronnie Kaufman/Larry Hirshowitz/Getty Images/Blend Images

New Physical Activity Guidelines Urge Americans: Move More, Sit Less

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/666744493/667118413" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Maria Fabrizio for NPR

A New Prescription For Depression: Join A Team And Get Sweaty

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/656594050/659416519" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Unless you replenish fluids, just an hour's hike in the heat or a 30-minute run might be enough to get mildly dehydrated, scientists say. RunPhoto/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
RunPhoto/Getty Images

Off Your Mental Game? You Could Be Mildly Dehydrated

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/632480321/633891504" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Physical therapist Ingrid Peele coaches Kim Brown through strengthening exercises to help her with her chronic pain, at the OSF Central Illinois Pain Center in Peoria. Kyle Travers/WFYI hide caption

toggle caption
Kyle Travers/WFYI
Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Hearts Get 'Younger,' Even At Middle Age, With Exercise

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/591513777/592823667" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Harnessing the power of wearable devices, data, education and a peer support group, people with prediabetes can lose weight and fend off the disease. Katherine Streeter for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Katherine Streeter for NPR

This Chef Lost 50 Pounds And Reversed Prediabetes With A Digital Program

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/589286575/590803681" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Equinox's rope class involves exercising with a jump rope. Courtesy of Equinox hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Equinox

Top Fitness Trends For 2018: Back To Basics

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/573051063/574932201" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Young bodies may more easily rebound from long bouts of sitting, with just an hour at the gym. But research suggests physical recovery from binge TV-watching gets harder in our 50s and as we get older. Lily Padula for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Lily Padula for NPR

Home For The Holidays? Get Off The Couch!

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/570905407/570926358" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Sara Wong for NPR

For People With Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, More Exercise Isn't Better

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/554369327/554994460" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Vanessa Wauchope begins abdominal exercises in Leah Keller's class in San Francisco, Calif. Keller teaches an exercise, called "drawing in," to help strengthen abdominal muscles that tend to spread apart a bit during pregnancy. Talia Herman for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Talia Herman for NPR

Women work on strengthening their core abdominal muscles in Leah Keller's exercise class for new moms, inside a San Francisco clothing store called Monkei Miles. Talia Herman for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Talia Herman for NPR

Flattening The 'Mummy Tummy' With 1 Exercise, 10 Minutes A Day

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/541204499/541969359" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

People who think they're more slothlike than peers may change their behavior to actually become less active. Oivind Hovland/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

toggle caption
Oivind Hovland/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Just Thinking You're Slacking On Exercise Could Boost Risk Of Death

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/538157820/538608524" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Older adults who own dogs walk more than those who don't own dogs, and that they're moving at a good clip, a study finds. fotografixx/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
fotografixx/Getty Images

Dog Owners Walk 22 Minutes More Per Day. And Yes, It Counts As Exercise

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/532625213/532646058" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Researchers had participants wear the fitness trackers while walking or running on a treadmill and while riding an exercise bike to determine how well the trackers measured heart rate and energy expenditure. Paul Sakuma/Courtesy of Stanford University School of Medicine hide caption

toggle caption
Paul Sakuma/Courtesy of Stanford University School of Medicine

Fitness Trackers: Good at Measuring Heart Rate, Not So Good At Measuring Calories

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/529839681/529893155" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

'Powwow Sweat' Promotes Fitness Through Traditional Dance

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/522994311/524301379" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Dr. Tonatiuh Barrientos Gutierrez, an epidemiologist in Mexico City, jogs near his home in the southern part of the capital. He says it's hard to run on the city's streets. Meghan Dhaliwal/for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Meghan Dhaliwal/for NPR

In Diabetes Fight, Lifestyle Changes Prove Hard To Come By In Mexico

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/522596080/522968658" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Women worry that bad things will happen if they exercise while pregnant, but doctors say in almost all cases it's not just safe, but can improve health. Alija/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption
Alija/Getty Images/iStockphoto