Palestinians Palestinians

Imad Abu Shamsiyeh, a Palestinian shoemaker from Hebron, filmed an Israeli soldier shooting a badly wounded Palestinian attacker in the head last year. A military court convicted the soldier of manslaughter. Abu Shamsiyeh says he's gotten death threats for filming the attack. Joanna Kakissis/NPR hide caption

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Joanna Kakissis/NPR

In West Bank, Witnesses To Conflict Are Using Video To Document What They See

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A photograph of the late Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat hangs outside a door leading to the small bedroom where he spent his final years, a display at the new Arafat Museum in the West Bank city of Ramallah. Abbas Momani/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Abbas Momani/AFP/Getty Images

In The Spot Where He Spent His Final Years, A Museum Honors Yasser Arafat

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Tamer Nafar (center), performs with the hip-hop group DAM. The members are all Arabs who are citizens of Israel, and some of their lyrics are harshly critical of the state. They see it as artistic freedom, while Israel's culture minister says such language could incite violence. Courtesy of Christopher Hazou hide caption

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Courtesy of Christopher Hazou

Arab Rapper Tests The Limit Of Israel's Artistic Freedoms

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Palestinian Saed Karzoun, 31, is a motivational speaker who preaches positive thinking in the West Bank. He acknowledges it's a hard sell, with many Palestinians saying they are depressed about the present and pessimistic about the future. Daniel Estrin/NPR hide caption

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Daniel Estrin/NPR

A Palestinian Preaches Positive Thinking To A Tough Crowd: His Own People

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Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas speaks in the West Bank town of Bethlehem on Oct. 1. Several days later, Abbas, 81, underwent an urgent cardiac test, but was soon released. The health scare has increased talk about a possible successor as the Palestinian leader. Majdi Mohammed/AP hide caption

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Majdi Mohammed/AP

An Israeli security officer next to an overturned vehicle belonging to a family of Jewish settlers ambushed near Hebron, in the West Bank, on July 1. Two Palestinians aided the wounded Israelis. One of the Palestinians has since lost his job and been targeted for abuse by fellow Palestinians. Courtesy of Judea and Samaria Fire and Rescue Department hide caption

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Courtesy of Judea and Samaria Fire and Rescue Department

After Aiding Injured Israelis, A Palestinian Is Targeted For Abuse

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Waad Qannam (left), 24, won a reality TV show called The President, in which the audience, instead of choosing its favorite singer, chose its favorite would-be leader. He is the closest Palestinians have come to electing a leader in more than a decade. Nick Schifrin/NPR hide caption

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Nick Schifrin/NPR

He's Not The Palestinian President, But He Played One On TV

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Mourners carry the body of Palestinian Laith al-Khaldi during his funeral procession at the Jalazoun refugee camp, near the West Bank city of Ramallah, on Aug. 1, 2015. An Israeli soldier shot Khaldi after he had been throwing rocks at a military post. This was during a relatively calm period, although almost two dozen Palestinians were killed during the first half of the year. Nasser Nasser/AP hide caption

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Nasser Nasser/AP

In The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict, Even Calm Is Deadly

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The lingerie factory was opened in the West Bank in the 1980s in an attempt to develop the Palestinian economy. The factory was shut in 1990 amid bouts of West Bank violence and troubles with Israeli military regulations. Racks of robes and camisoles still hang in the production room. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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Emily Harris/NPR

An Israeli-Palestinian Battle With Roots In Lingerie

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Israeli soldiers walk near a temporary checkpoint at the entrance of the Palestinian village of Yatta in the West Bank on Thursday after army forces entered the village in search of clues to Wednesday night's shootings in the Israeli city of Tel Aviv. Hazem Bader /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Hazem Bader /AFP/Getty Images

Mohammad al-Hattab (left) and Samira Syam both teach driving at the al-Jarajwa school in Gaza City. Hattab was stopped by Hamas police, and his permit to teach temporarily revoked, for driving alone with a female student. Syam says nobody bothers her if she has a male student alone. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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Emily Harris/NPR

Hamas: Gaza Women Learning To Drive Must Have A Chaperone

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Avigdor Lieberman, who became Israel's new defense minister this week, visits Jerusalem's Old City on March 9. Lieberman's hard-line positions and controversial remarks have ignited fierce debate in Israel and beyond. Mahmoud Illean/AP hide caption

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Mahmoud Illean/AP

Here's Why Israel's New Defense Minister Is So Controversial

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A mural on the wall of the boys' high school in Sair, a Palestinian town in the West Bank. More than a dozen young men from Sair were killed by Israeli forces since last fall, including during attacks on Israelis. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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Emily Harris/NPR

A Fall In Knife Attacks On Israelis, Amid A Shifting Palestinian Mood

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