The Holocaust The Holocaust
Stories About

The Holocaust

Planet Flem

Walter Arlen in Chicago, pictured circa 1942. Walter Arlen hide caption

toggle caption
Walter Arlen

Forensic musicologists race to rescue works lost after the Holocaust

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1151362530/1152140637" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Public officials including Israeli Knesset President Mickey Levy, German President Frank-Walter Steinmeier and German Chancellor Olaf Scholz attend a wreath-laying ceremony on International Holocaust Remembrance Day at the Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe on Thursday in Berlin. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Sean Gallup/Getty Images

A court in Germany convicted a 93-year-old man for assisting in more than 5,200 murders committed at the Stutthof concentration camp, where he served as a guard, beginning in 1944. Czarek Sokolowski/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Czarek Sokolowski/AP

A photograph of Vladimir Munk, (center), taken in March 1938 before the Nazis invaded Czechoslovakia. After being imprisoned in concentration camps for years, Munk returned to his hometown of Pardubice, Czechoslovakia in May 1945 (right). Emily Russell/NCPR hide caption

toggle caption
Emily Russell/NCPR

Holocaust Survivor Returning To Auschwitz: 'It's Like Going To The Family Cemetery'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/798242097/799183152" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Pope Francis lamented that the Latin name Archivium Secretum — of the Vatican Secret Archive originally meant to convey that the archive was private — had come to connote something more sinister. Giovanni Ciarlo/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Giovanni Ciarlo/AP

Renia Spiegel (left) and her younger sister, now known as Elizabeth Bellak, wade in the Dniester River around 1935. The photo can be seen on the cover of the published edition of Renia's Diary. Courtesy of Elizabeth Bellak/St. Martin's Press hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Elizabeth Bellak/St. Martin's Press

Renia Spiegel's Diary Survived The Holocaust. People Are Finally Reading It

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/765165687/765653433" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Patrick Desbois began investigating Nazi crimes because of his family history. His grandfather was deported to a work camp in Ukraine during World War II but never spoke about what had happened. "So I decided to go there one day," he says, "and that's when I discovered that the Germans shot at a minimum 18,000 Jews, plus gypsies, plus Soviet prisoners. But no one wanted to speak about it." Christophe Archambault/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Christophe Archambault/AFP/Getty Images

After Documenting Nazi Crimes, A French Priest Exposes ISIS Attacks On Yazidis

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/592899463/594489258" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

French far-right candidate Marine Le Pen's National Front party now has a new interim leader, after Jean-Francois Jalkh (right) stepped down over comments about the Holocaust. The two are seen here at the Elysee in 2014. Alain Jocard/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alain Jocard/AFP/Getty Images

Marie Jalowicz Simon survived the Holocaust by hiding with friends and strangers in Berlin. From the private collection of Hermann Simon hide caption

toggle caption
From the private collection of Hermann Simon

A Young Woman Goes 'Underground In Berlin' To Escape The Holocaust

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/435550677/436013209" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Alice Herz-Sommer in July 2010. 'The Lady in Number 6'/AP hide caption

toggle caption
'The Lady in Number 6'/AP

From the documentary 'The Lady in Number 6': Alice Herz-Sommer says whether life is good or not 'depends on me.'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/281965889/282064459" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

In the Hall of Remembrance at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, visitors can light candles in memory of the 6 million Jews killed by the Nazis and their collaborators during World War II. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images