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On the day of the Lion Air crash, Verian Utama (left) was traveling on the flight with a former pro rider named Andrea Manfredi (right), a friend who also perished. Courtesy of Verian Utama's family hide caption

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Courtesy of Verian Utama's family

For Family Of A Lion Air Crash Victim, 'The Happiness Is Gone'

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Rescuers are recovering victims and searching for survivors of flash floods in Papua province, Indonesia. Indonesian National Search and Rescue Agency/AP hide caption

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Indonesian National Search and Rescue Agency/AP

Vietnamese Doan Thi Huong, center, is escorted by police as she leaves Shah Alam High Court in Malaysia on Thursday. Malaysia's attorney general ordered the murder case to proceed against the Vietnamese woman accused in the killing of the North Korean leader's estranged half brother. Vincent Thian/AP hide caption

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Vincent Thian/AP

An estimated 5,500 Komodo dragons live in Komodo National Park. Michael Sullivan for NPR hide caption

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Michael Sullivan for NPR

Amid Tourism Push, Concern Grows Over Indonesia's Komodo Dragons

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Indonesian soldiers search for the bodies of tsunami victims at a beach resort on the island of Java on Monday. Waves swept terrified people into the sea Saturday night following an eruption on Anak Krakatau, one of the world's most infamous volcanic islands. Achmad Ibrahim/AP hide caption

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Achmad Ibrahim/AP

Alba, believed to be the world's only albino orangutan, was rehabilitated after she suffered a harsh captivity in Borneo. She's now been released and is living in the wild again. Christoph Sator/Picture Alliance via Getty Image hide caption

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Christoph Sator/Picture Alliance via Getty Image

Nurcahyo Utomo, an investigator for Indonesia's National Transportation Safety Committee, speaks at a news conference in Jakarta, Indonesia, on Wednesday, about preliminary findings from the investigation into the crash of Lion Air Flight 610. Achmad Ibrahim/AP hide caption

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Achmad Ibrahim/AP

Researchers collect samples from the carcass of a dead whale at Wakatobi National Park in Southeast Sulawesi, Indonesia. Muhammad Irpan Sejati Tassakka/AKKP Wakatobi via AP hide caption

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Muhammad Irpan Sejati Tassakka/AKKP Wakatobi via AP

Families of victims of Lion Air Flight JT610 attend a meeting with authorities and Lion Air management on Monday in Jakarta, Indonesia. All 189 passengers and crew are feared to have died when the plane crashed shortly after takeoff on Oct. 29. Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images hide caption

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Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images

Next of kin attempt to identify personal items of loved ones who were on board Lion Air flight JT610, at a port in Jakarta on Wednesday. Bay Ismoyo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Bay Ismoyo/AFP/Getty Images

Relatives of passengers of Lion Air flight JT610 that crashed into the sea cry at the airport on Monday in Pangkal Pinang, Indonesia, where the plane was bound. Antara Foto Agency/Reuters hide caption

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Antara Foto Agency/Reuters

Vera Rahayu Putri and her husband Faizal, who goes by one name, survey earthquake damage in their Palu neighborhood of Petobo, now covered by mudslides. Putri€'s 9-year-old son, Raldi, is among thousands of children who are unaccounted for. Lauren Frayer/NPR hide caption

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Lauren Frayer/NPR

Parents Search For Lost Children After Indonesia's Disaster

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The Donggala District Prison was torched by rioting prisoners one day after the double earthquake and tsunami disasters on Sept. 28. Donggala is close to the epicenter of the earthquake, and rattled prisoners wanted a way out. Noele Mage/NPR hide caption

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Noele Mage/NPR

Why Inmates Set Free After The Indonesia Quake Are Returning To Their Prison

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A search-and-rescue team member scans the ruins of an area in Palu, on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi on Thursday. Of the more than 1,500 people who died in the disaster, authorities say more than 1,200 lived in Palu. Carl Court/Getty Images hide caption

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Carl Court/Getty Images