Mexico's drug wars Mexico's drug wars

Line workers sort freshly cut avocados at Frutas Finas packing plant in Tancitaro. Forty-five percent of the world's avocados come from Mexico. Eighty percent of avocados consumed in the U.S. come from Mexico, the majority from the small mountain town of Tancitaro. Carrie Kahn/NPR hide caption

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Carrie Kahn/NPR

Blood Avocados No More: Mexican Farm Town Says It's Kicked Out Cartels

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Spent bullet casings litter a road after authorities reported a gunbattle outside Mazatlan, Mexico, in July 2017, a year marked by the highest homicides in at least decades. Mario Rivera Alvarado/AP hide caption

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Mario Rivera Alvarado/AP

A Mexican soldier piles poppies for incineration near the town of Tlacotepec, in Guerrero state, Mexico. The army says it slashes and burns poppy when fields are too difficult to access by helicopter or when it wants to protect fruits and vegetables growing nearby. James Fredrick for NPR hide caption

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James Fredrick for NPR

On The Hunt For Poppies In Mexico — America's Biggest Heroin Supplier

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Mexican marines arrive after an attack against the building of the Quintana Roo State Prosecution in Cancun earlier this year. A new report on armed conflicts included Mexico's drug cartel violence in its rankings. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

In 2013, residents of some towns in western Mexico took up arms in an effort to defend their villages against drug gangs. Marco Ugarte/AP hide caption

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Marco Ugarte/AP

'Cartel' Author Spins A Grand Tale Of Mexico's Drug Wars

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Concertgoers take photos of the band Intocable at a concert in Juarez, Mexico last year. Kainaz Amaria/NPR hide caption

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Kainaz Amaria/NPR

The Violence Subsides, And Revelers Return To Juarez

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State police officers patrol a highway between Ciudad Victoria and Matamoros, in northeast Mexico, in 2011. Mexico's drug and turf wars have descended on the once tourist friendly border town of Matamoros. Alexandre Meneghini/AP hide caption

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Alexandre Meneghini/AP

Matamoros Becomes Ground Zero As Drug War Shifts On Mexican Border

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Flowers, candles and handwritten messages remembering the 43 missing students line the fence at the National Palace in Zocalo, Mexico City. Geovien So/Barcroft Media/Landov hide caption

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Geovien So/Barcroft Media/Landov

Survivor Of Mexican Student Attacks Tells Of Bullet-Riddled Escape

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Mexico's Attorney General Jesus Murillo Karam addresses a news conference in Mexico City on Friday. He announced the arrest of three suspects in the brutal slaying of 43 students in the country's south. Mario Guzman/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Mario Guzman/EPA/Landov

Images from posters made by relatives show 10 of the 12 young people kidnapped in broad daylight from a bar in Mexico City on May 26. No one has claimed responsibility for the brazen abduction. Marco Ugarte/AP hide caption

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Marco Ugarte/AP

Mass Kidnapping Puts Mexican Legal System On Trial

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Children portray drug lords, corrupt police officers and human traffickers in "Niños Incómodos," which was viewed more than 1.8 million times in one week on YouTube. YouTube hide caption

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YouTube