PTSD PTSD

Firefighters work beneath the vertical struts of the World Trade Center's twin towers, in Lower Manhattan, following the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. Mark Lennihan/Associated Press hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/Associated Press

Sept. 11 First Responder Fights On Behalf Of Others Who Rushed To Help

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A patient is evacuated from Baptist Hospitals of Southeast Texas in Beaumont, Texas, on Thursday. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Texas Expedites Help From Out-Of-State Health Care Providers

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A U.S. Marine from the 1st Battalion, 8th Marines, Alpha Company looks out as an evening storm gathers above an outpost near Kunjak, in southern Afghanistan's Helmand province. Finbarr O'Reilly/Reuters/Viking hide caption

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Finbarr O'Reilly/Reuters/Viking

A Retired Marine And A Photojournalist Confront War's 'Invisible Injuries'

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Doc Todd's hip-hop album is called Combat Medicine. Hyperion Productions/Courtesy of Doc Todd hide caption

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Hyperion Productions/Courtesy of Doc Todd

'Combat Medicine:' Afghanistan Vet Seeks To Help Others Through Hip-Hop

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Gerry Realin (left) and his wife Jessica are working to get first responders workers' compensation benefits in Florida. Abe Aboraya/WMFE hide caption

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Abe Aboraya/WMFE

A Pulse Nightclub Responder Confronts A New Crisis: PTSD

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A pilot prepares to launch an unmanned aerial vehicle from a ground control station earlier this year. The Air Force is moving to treat psychological stress faced by remote pilots and analysts a little more like the effects of traditional warfare. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

The Warfare May Be Remote But The Trauma Is Real

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Jay Zimmerman (left) and his father, Buddy, in July 2016. Buddy, who was also a veteran, passed away last September. Courtesy of Jay Zimmerman hide caption

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Courtesy of Jay Zimmerman

Veteran Teaches Therapists How To Talk About Gun Safety When Suicide's A Risk

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U.S. Marines march in the annual Veterans Day Parade along Fifth Avenue in 2014 in New York City. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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For Veterans, Trauma Of War Can Persist In Struggles With Sexual Intimacy

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Tom Frame, an Army staff sergeant in Vietnam, has battled post-traumatic stress ever since the war, as have many of his fellow soldiers. Courtesy of Kara Frame hide caption

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Courtesy of Kara Frame

Charles Mayer, 30, of San Diego survived an IED attack while serving in Iraq in 2010, but has suffered from complications including PTSD. Stuart Palley for NPR hide caption

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Stuart Palley for NPR

War Studies Suggest A Concussion Leaves The Brain Vulnerable To PTSD

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Stacy Bannerman testifies before the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Military Quality of Life and Veterans Affairs in 2006. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc./Getty Images hide caption

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After Combat Stress, Violence Can Show Up At Home

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Cheryl Woolnough, director of training at Patriot PAWS in Rockwall, Texas, works with Papi, a Labrador retriever. Lauren Silverman/KERA News hide caption

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Lauren Silverman/KERA News

Veterans Say Trained Dogs Help With PTSD, But The VA Won't Pay

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David Carlson served two tours in Iraq while in the military. Courtesy of David Carlson hide caption

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Courtesy of David Carlson

Behind Bars, Vets With PTSD Face A New War Zone, With Little Support

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Ecstasy pills confiscated by law enforcement. For decades, MDMA has gotten a reputation as a dangerous club drug — but reporter Kelley McMillan says it was first used for therapeutic purposes in the '70s. Fernando Camino/Cover/Getty Images hide caption

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Fernando Camino/Cover/Getty Images

From Club To Clinic: How MDMA Could Help Some Cope With Trauma

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