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Valery Hache/AFP via Getty Images

A photograph taken from the French riviera city of Nice, shows lightning flashes in a supercell thunderstorm over the Mediterranean sea in August 2022. Valery Hache/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Valery Hache/AFP via Getty Images

Thousands of dancing fireflies in Japan create an enchanted forest. Photographer Kei Nomiyama has visited the Japanese island Shikoku every year since 2012 to capture the mesmerizing images of thousands of fireflies glowing in the forest. Kei Nomiyama/Barcroft Media via Getty Images hide caption

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Kei Nomiyama/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Lightning strikes on August 5, 2005 southwest of Barstow, California David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

Fulgurite: What A Lightning-Formed Rock May Have Contributed To Life On Earth

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Lightning may have played a key role in the emergence of life on Earth. Nolan Caldwell/Getty Images hide caption

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Nolan Caldwell/Getty Images

How A Building Block Of Life Got Created In A Flash

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Officials from the Norwegian Nature Inspectorate discovered hundreds of dead reindeer on a mountain plateau after a lightning storm. Havard Kjontvedt/Norwegian Nature Inspectorate hide caption

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Havard Kjontvedt/Norwegian Nature Inspectorate

You don't have to be outdoors to be hurt or injured by a nearby lightning strike, like this one in New Mexico. The pain for survivors can be lifelong. Marko Korosec/Barcroft Media/Landov hide caption

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Marko Korosec/Barcroft Media/Landov

'When Thunder Roars, Go Indoors' To Best Avoid Lightning's Pain

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Lightning strikes near Ben Hill Griffin Stadium at Florida Field in Gainesville, Fla., in August. A new study says a rise in average global temperatures due to climate change will increase the frequency of lightning strikes. Phil Sandlin/AP hide caption

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Phil Sandlin/AP