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Rwandan genocide

France Mukantagazwa, who lost her father and other relatives in the Rwanda genocide and believes their bodies may be in the newly found graves, cries as she speaks to reporters at the site on Thursday. Eric Murinzi/AP hide caption

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Eric Murinzi/AP

The idea behind "Musekeweya", or the New Dawn, is to do the opposite of what the government's notorious "hate radio" did 20 years ago as it stoked ethnic hatred during the genocide carried out by Hutu extremists. Stephanie Aglietti/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephanie Aglietti/AFP/Getty Images

Romeo & Juliet In Kigali: How A Soap Opera Sought To Change Behavior In Rwanda

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Thousands gather to celebrate Liberation Day in Shyira, Rwanda. Twenty-three years ago, a rebel army led by Paul Kagame, now the president, marched into Kigali to end a genocide against the Tutsi minority. Eyder Peralta/NPR hide caption

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Eyder Peralta/NPR

In Rwanda, July 4 Isn't Independence Day — It's Liberation Day

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Three groups say BNP Paribas transferred $1.3 million that was used to purchase weapons, in violation of a U.N. arms embargo. Remy de la Mauviniere/Associated Press hide caption

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Remy de la Mauviniere/Associated Press

Rwanda is known as "le pays des milles collines" €-- the land of a thousand hills. Weather varies by altitude; for farmers, detailed forecasts can make a huge difference. Francesco Fiondella/International Research Institute for Climate and Society hide caption

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Francesco Fiondella/International Research Institute for Climate and Society

Turns Out You Do Need A Weatherman To Know Which Way The Wind Blew

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Dozens of Hutu refugees flee fighting between Hutus and Tutsis in Kigali, Rwanda, in April 1994, about a month before an internal White House email on the possible consequences of calling the killings a genocide. Jean-March Bouju/AP hide caption

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Jean-March Bouju/AP

NPR's Jackie Northam reporting from Rwanda during the country's genocide in 1994. NPR hide caption

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A Reporter Reflects On Rwanda: 'It's Like A Madness Took Over'

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Former Rwandan army chief General Augustin Bizimungu in July, 1994. VINCENT AMALVY/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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VINCENT AMALVY/AFP/Getty Images