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U.S. health officials are again urging people to stop vaping until experts figure out why some are coming down with serious respiratory illnesses. Richard Vogel/AP hide caption

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Richard Vogel/AP

The New York State Department of Health said Thursday that it is looking at vitamin E acetate as a potential cause of severe pulmonary illness cases in the state that have been associated with vaping. Daniel Becerril/Reuters hide caption

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Daniel Becerril/Reuters

A rock of crystal methamphetamine lifted from a suspect in Orange County, Calif. This fall, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention expects to begin collecting more local information about the rising use of meth, cocaine and other stimulants. Leonard Ortiz/Getty Images hide caption

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Leonard Ortiz/Getty Images

Seizures Of Methamphetamine Are Surging In The U.S.

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The increase in suicide rates was highest for girls ages 10 to 14, rising by nearly 13% since 2007. While for boys of the same age, it rose by 7%. Nicole Xu for NPR hide caption

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Nicole Xu for NPR

Suicide Rate For Girls Has Been Rising Faster Than For Boys, Study Finds

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A measles outbreak in Washington state has triggered a state of emergency. In Clark County, where 35 cases have been reported, 31 were not immunized. Courtney Perry for The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Courtney Perry for The Washington Post/Getty Images

Syringes of fentanyl, an opioid painkiller, sit in an inpatient facility in Salt Lake City. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, opioid-related overdoses have contributed to the life expectancy drop in the U.S. Rick Bowmer/AP hide caption

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Rick Bowmer/AP

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention traced an ongoing E. coli outbreak to the Central Coastal region of California. If you're sure your lettuce was grown elsewhere, you can eat it. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says a recent E. coli outbreak is linked to romaine lettuce grown in Yuma, Ariz. At least 53 people have reported illnesses, 31 have been hospitalized. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

Rapid detection of outbreaks is critical. That's why the CDC partnered with Uganda on a pilot program to speed things up. Above: Workers at an Ebola emergency response center in Sierra Leone during the outbreak that began in 2014. David P. Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David P. Gilkey/NPR

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention changed the topic of a nuclear strike preparedness session, opting to focus on a widespread flu outbreak. Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images

Flu patient Donnie Cardenas waits in an emergency room hallway with roommate Torrey Jewett at the Palomar Medical Center in Escondido, Calif., this past week. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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Gregory Bull/AP

Flu Season Is Shaping Up To Be A Nasty One, CDC Says

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Dr. Terry Horton, chief of addiction medicine and medical director of Project Engage at Christiana Care Health System, testified about opioid addiction before a U.S. Senate committee in May. Courtesy of Christiana Care Health System hide caption

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Courtesy of Christiana Care Health System

Asking About Opioids: A Treatment Plan Can Make All The Difference

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