autism autism

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton (left) hugs Annette Bebout, 73, of Newton, during a campaign event at Berg Middle School, in Newton, Iowa, this week. Bebout told her story to the audience of how she lost her home. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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Paul Sancya/AP

Clinton Runs As Wonk In Chief, Trying To Win Hearts With Plans

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In researching their book, Caren Zucker and John Donvan tracked down Donald Gray Triplett (center), the first person officially diagnosed with autism. Now in his 80s, Triplett has had a long, happy life, Donvan says, maybe partly because his hometown embraced him from the beginning as " 'odd, but really, really smart.' " Courtesy of Penguin Random House hide caption

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Courtesy of Penguin Random House

'In A Different Key' Traces History And Politics Of Autism

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The Hammetts smooth out stray strands of hair on Francis' head. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

After The Diagnosis: How Families Experience Autism

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 1 in 68 children has an autism spectrum disorder. Kelvin Murray/Getty Images hide caption

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Kelvin Murray/Getty Images

'NeuroTribes' Examines The History — And Myths — Of The Autism Spectrum

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Jonathan Keleher talks with a colleague, Rafael Wainhaus, at work. Keleher was born without a cerebellum, but his brain has developed work-arounds for solving problems of balance and abstract thought. Ellen Webber for NPR hide caption

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Ellen Webber for NPR

Clues To Autism, Schizophrenia Emerge From Cerebellum Research

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