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Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan visits the city center destroyed by last the Feb. 6 earthquake in Kahramanmaras, southern Turkey, on Feb. 8. Turkish Presidency via AP hide caption

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Turkish Presidency via AP

Many Western states lack building codes that require wildfire-resistant materials, but a new study shows the cost can be minimal. JOSH EDELSON/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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JOSH EDELSON/AFP via Getty Images

Hurricane Irma damaged homes in the Florida Keys in 2017. A new study finds buildings in the contiguous U.S. are concentrated in disaster-prone areas. Matt McClain/AP hide caption

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Matt McClain/AP

More Than Half Of U.S. Buildings Are In Places Prone To Disaster, Study Finds

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Flames approach houses during the Tick Fire on Oct. 24, 2019 in Canyon Country, California. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

Rebuilding After A Wildfire? Most States Don't Require Fire-Resistant Materials

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Firefighters struggle to protect homes from the embers generated by bushfires near the town of Nowra in New South Wales, Australia. Saeed Khan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saeed Khan/AFP via Getty Images

Australian Fires Prompt Questions About Protecting Houses From Embers

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A motorists on Highway 101 watches flames from the Thomas fire leap above the roadway north of Ventura, Calif., in December 2017. Hundreds of homes were destroyed in what was then California's most destructive wildfire. Noah Berger/AP hide caption

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Noah Berger/AP

Fire-Resistant Is Not Fire-Proof, California Homeowners Discover

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The cladding used in a 2016 refurbishing of Grenfell Tower in London helped last week's fatal fire spread. The combustible material is permitted in some parts of the U.S. Niklas Halle'n/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Niklas Halle'n/AFP/Getty Images

A man stands near collapsed houses in Bhaktapur, on the outskirts of Kathmandu, on April 27, two days after a magnitude-7.8 earthquake hit Nepal. Aftershocks tend to get less frequent with time, scientists say, but not necessarily gentler. Prakash Mathema/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Prakash Mathema/AFP/Getty Images

Big Aftershocks In Nepal Could Persist For Years

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In Joplin today: Some of the destruction. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

'It's Definitely Easier To Engineer For An Earthquake' Than Tornadoes

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