El Salvador El Salvador

A member of a migrant caravan from Central America kisses a baby as they pray in preparation for an asylum request in the U.S., in Tijuana, Baja California state, Mexico. Edgard Garrido/REUTERS hide caption

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Edgard Garrido/REUTERS

Central American migrants taking part in the "Migrant Via Crucis" caravan toward the United States, arrive in Mexico, on Friday where they will attend a legal clinic with NGOs on human rights. President Donald Trump tweeted his condemnation of the caravan. Jose Castanares/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jose Castanares/AFP/Getty Images

A Salvadoran Woman Missed Her U.S. Court Date. What Happens Next?

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A Central American immigrant seeking asylum crossed the border with her son in 2017. The American court system bewilders her, she says. Samantha Balaban/NPR hide caption

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Samantha Balaban/NPR

Without A Lawyer, Asylum-Seekers Struggle With Confusing Legal Processes

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Victoria Falls sits on the border between Zambia and Zimbabwe. Photos of beautiful scenes from Africa and Haiti have been flooding the Internet in response to President Trump's reported slur. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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President Trump listens as Norwegian Prime Minister Erna Solberg speaks at a joint news conference Wednesday. At an Oval Office meeting on immigration policy, Trump said the U.S. should want more people from countries like Norway, disparaging Haiti and what he called "shithole countries" in Africa. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

'Racist' And 'Shameful': How Other Countries Are Responding To Trump's Slur

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President Donald Trump listens during a meeting with lawmakers on immigration policy in the Cabinet Room of the White House on Tuesday, where he reportedly made the controversial remarks. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

A Salvadoran man reads a newspaper at a market in San Salvador on January 8. The newspaper headline reads: "The United States will decide today the future of TPS." Salvador Melendez/AP hide caption

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Salvador Melendez/AP

What You May Not Realize About The End Of TPS Status For Salvadorans

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Construction workers at a site in Miami. Thousands of construction workers in the U.S. face the elimination of their temporary protected status and the prospect of deportation. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Ending Temporary Protection For Foreign Workers Could Hurt U.S. Rebuilding Efforts

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Julio Calderon, 28, an undocumented immigrant from Honduras, listens after speaking in favor of renewing temporary protected status for immigrants from Central America and Haiti now living in the United States, during a news conference Monday, Nov. 6, 2017, in Miami. Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

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Lynne Sladky/AP

Police arrest gang members suspected of involvement in the shootings that killed eight bus drivers and one other transit worker in San Salvador last July. Encarni Pindado for NPR hide caption

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Encarni Pindado for NPR

City, Interrupted: How Gang Killings Brought San Salvador To A Halt

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Pregnant women infected by the Zika virus are concerned about the possible link to a birth defect. Above: Angelica Prato of Colombia has a checkup. Schneyder Mendoza /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Is It Realistic To Recommend Delaying Pregnancy During Zika Outbreak?

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Cuban migrants prepare to board a flight from Costa Rice to El Salvador on Jan. 12. This was the first of up to 28 flights out of Costa Rica that will allow nearly 8,000 stranded Cubans to continue their journey to the United States. CARLOS GONZALEZ/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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CARLOS GONZALEZ/AFP/Getty Images

At The U.S. Border, Cubans Are Welcomed, Salvadorans Deported

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Leslie Morales (from left), Soraya Mohamud and Tanjum Choudhury discuss what it's like to be 15. All three are sophomores at Montgomery Blair High School in Silver Spring, Md. Akash Ghai/NPR hide caption

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American Girls Weigh In: 'We're Not Just Sitting Ducks': #15Girls

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A policeman detains a suspected member of the MS-13 gang at a checkpoint in San Salvador during a ban on public transport imposed by the gangs. Encarni Pindado for NPR hide caption

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Encarni Pindado for NPR

The mother of an assassinated bus driver buries her son at a cemetery on the outskirts of San Salvador. Encarni Pindado for NPR hide caption

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Encarni Pindado for NPR

Gangs Demand That San Salvador's Buses Stop Running, But Why?

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Suspected members of El Salvador's 18th Street gang stand handcuffed in pairs at a police station in Panchimalco, near San Salvador. The government has launched well-publicized raids, roundups and a crackdown on gang leaders, locking them away in maximum security prisons. Manu Brabo/AP hide caption

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Manu Brabo/AP

In El Salvador, Gang Killings Take An Agonizing Toll

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Marta Elsie Leveron, 19, (left) and her brother Freddy David Leveron, 18, have not seen their father since he left El Savador to work in California in 1999. A new U.S. program allows families to reunite if one parent is a legal U.S. resident. The girl in the middle is Liliana Beatriz Leveron, 16, a cousin of the other two. Her parents are in the U.S. and she's seeking to reunite with them as well. Carrie Kahn/NPR hide caption

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Carrie Kahn/NPR

A Father In California, Kids In El Salvador, And New Hope To Reunite

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