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South Korean Foreign Minister Kang Kyung-wha (right) shakes hands with Timothy Betts, acting Deputy Assistant Secretary and Senior Advisor for Security Negotiations and Agreements in the U.S. Department of State (left) during their meeting on Feb. 10. Lee Jin-Man/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Lee Jin-Man/Pool/Getty Images

U.S. And South Korea Reach Deal On Military Costs

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In this Nov. 7, 2018, photo released by the U.S. Army, U.S. soldiers gather for a brief during a combined joint patrol rehearsal in Manbij, Syria. Spc. Zoe Garbarino/U.S. Army via AP hide caption

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Spc. Zoe Garbarino/U.S. Army via AP

Defense Secretary Jim Mattis and China's Defense Minister Gen. Wei Fenghe stand as the national anthems are played before their meeting at the Pentagon on Friday. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

The White House is proposing changes to the Military Lending Act that critics say would leave service members vulnerable when they buy cars. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

White House Takes Aim At Financial Protections For Military

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UCLA researchers are using a radioactive tracer, which binds to abnormal proteins in the brain, to see if it is possible to diagnose chronic traumatic encephalopathy in living patients. Warmer colors in these PET scans indicate higher concentrations of the tracer. UCLA hide caption

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UCLA

The Um Jurius fire base is near Syria's border and Sinjar mountain, where minority Yazidis fled to escape an ISIS genocide in 2014. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

From Deep In The Iraqi Desert, A New U.S. Fire Base Targets ISIS In Syria

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U.S. and South Korean soldiers sit inside an amphibious vehicle during an annual joint military landing exercise in Pohang, on South Korea's southeast coast, in March 2016. Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images

Would The U.S. Withdraw Troops From South Korea?

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The remains of Staff Sgt. Dustin Wright are transferred at Dover Air Force Base, Del., in October. Wright and three other American soldiers were killed in an ambush in Niger. Pfc. Lane Hiser/U.S. Army via AP hide caption

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Pfc. Lane Hiser/U.S. Army via AP

Pentagon Report: Multiple Failures Led To Deaths Of 4 Troops In Niger

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A U.S. Army team transfers the remains of Staff Sgt. Dustin Wright, 29, of Lyons, Ga., at Dover Air Force Base, Del., on Oct. 5. Wright was one of four U.S. troops killed in an ambush in Niger. Staff Sgt. Aaron J. Jenne/U.S. Air Force via AP hide caption

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Staff Sgt. Aaron J. Jenne/U.S. Air Force via AP

Four American soldiers were killed in Niger last Oct 4. From left, they are Staff Sgt. Bryan C. Black, 35, of Puyallup, Wash.; Staff Sgt. Jeremiah W. Johnson, 39, of Springboro, Ohio; Sgt. La David Johnson of Miami Gardens, Fla.; and Staff Sgt. Dustin M. Wright, 29, of Lyons, Ga. A Pentagon report cites multiple failures with the mission, and the military is now briefing families of those killed. AP hide caption

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AP

Pentagon Acknowledges Mistakes As It Briefs Families Of Troops Killed In Niger

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Senegalese Army Gen. Amadou Kane (left) receives the 2016 Flintlock flag from U.S. Army Gen. Donald Bolduc during the inauguration of a military base in Thiès, Senegal, in February 2016, during a three-week joint military exercise between African, U.S. and European troops known as Flintlock. Seyllou/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Seyllou/AFP/Getty Images

The U.S. Has No Clear Strategy For Africa. Here's Why It Really Needs One

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A Navy fighter jet comes in for a landing on the aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson in the South China Sea. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Anthony Kuhn/NPR

The U.S. Positions Warships In Tense Asia-Pacific Waters

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Entrance to Camps 5 and 6, Naval Station Guantánamo Bay. (Photo reviewed and cleared by U.S. military.) David Welna/NPR hide caption

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David Welna/NPR

On A Tense Press Tour Of Guantánamo's Prison Complex, Signs Of Expansion

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Sgt. Nick Cunningham speeds down the track during men's bobsled training on Friday. He is one of seven U.S. service members competing in Pyeongchang. "They told me, 'Go win medals for this country,'" Cunningham says. "And that's my job at this moment." Quinn Rooney/Getty Images hide caption

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Quinn Rooney/Getty Images

Some of the devastation caused by the fight to remove ISIS from Raqqa, Syria. Greg Dixon/NPR hide caption

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Greg Dixon/NPR

U.S. Military Mission In Syria Endures As ISIS Nears Defeat

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An Army team at Dover Air Force Base, Del., carries a transfer case containing the remains of Sgt. 1st Class Hughton O. Brown on Nov. 16. Steve Ruark/AP hide caption

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Steve Ruark/AP

The Delicate And Draining Task Of Tending To America's Fallen Troops

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U.S. Army Lt. Gen. Paul Funk (left), and Iraqi Maj. Gen. Najm Abdullah al-Jibouri, walk through a busy market in Mosul, Iraq, on Oct. 4. U.S. forces in Iraq, Syria and Afghanistan have been increasing this year under President Trump, going from about 18,000 at the beginning of the year to 26,000 recently, according to Pentagon figures. Spc. Avery Howard/AP hide caption

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Spc. Avery Howard/AP

Myeshia Johnson, widow of U.S. Army Sergeant La David Johnson, who was among four special forces soldiers killed in Niger, sits with her daughter, Ah'Leeysa Johnson at a graveside service in Hollywood, Fla., on Oct. 21. Joe Skipper/Reuters hide caption

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Joe Skipper/Reuters

A U.S. Army team transfers the remains of Staff Sgt. Dustin Wright, 29, of Lyons, Ga., at Dover Air Force Base, Del., on Oct. 5. Wright was one of four U.S. troops killed in an ambush in Niger. U.S. forces work with many African militaries. While the Americans are advising and assisting in most cases, they also travel into the field, where they can face combat. Staff Sgt. Aaron J. Jenne/U.S. Air Force via AP hide caption

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Staff Sgt. Aaron J. Jenne/U.S. Air Force via AP