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An image taken from a TD Canada Trust error message that NPR received when trying to read about how the institution handles bank drafts. TD Canada Trust/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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TD Canada Trust/Screenshot by NPR

Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Director Richard Cordray, shown last October at a panel discussion in Richmond, Va., called Tuesday's vote "a giant setback for every consumer in this country. Wall Street won and ordinary people lost." Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

Senate Kills Rule On Class-Action Suits Against Financial Companies

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Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen testifies before the Senate Banking Committee in July. President Trump has given mixed signals about whether he will re-appoint her when her term as chair expires in February. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

A Wells Fargo Bank branch office in San Francisco. The bank acknowledges it signed up nearly 500,000 auto-loan customers for insurance they didn't need. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Who Snatched My Car? Wells Fargo Did

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Weiqi Zhu, an equity derivatives trader in Hong Kong, is one of an increasing number of financial sector employees from mainland China who are dominating the city's banking sector. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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Rob Schmitz/NPR

How Hong Kong's Banks Turned Chinese

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Large German bank KfW says it quickly recovered money it had mistakenly sent to four other banks. Here, one of its Berlin offices is seen in a 2015 photo. ullstein bild/ullstein bild via Getty Images hide caption

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ullstein bild/ullstein bild via Getty Images

Hotel employees watch Donald Trump following a ribbon-cutting ceremony at the new Trump International Hotel on Oct. 26 in Washington, D.C. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Trump's Loans From Troubled German Bank Pose Conflict Of Interest

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Wall Street financier Steve Mnuchin is being considered to serve as Treasury secretary under Donald Trump. Mnuchin assembled investors who bought IndyMac, a failed bank that had been taken over by the FDIC. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Trump's Potential Treasury Secretary Headed A 'Foreclosure Machine'

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Sen. Chris Dodd and Rep. Barney Frank celebrate as their Dodd-Frank banking regulation bill is signed into law in 2010. President-elect Donald Trump has said he is interested in doing away with it. Charles Dharapak/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

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Charles Dharapak/ASSOCIATED PRESS
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'Mystery Shoppers' Help U.S. Regulators Fight Racial Discrimination At Banks

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House Financial Services Committee Chairman Jeb Hensarling, shown here at a hearing in March, claims many of the provisions in Dodd-Frank have hurt the economy. Jacquelyn Martin/wld hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/wld

Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Director Richard Cordray says financial firms use arbitration to "sidestep the legal system [and] avoid accountability." But industry officials say a proposed ban on mandatory arbitration clauses will lead to frivolous legal action. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

New Rule Would Make It Easier For Consumers To Sue Banks

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The JPMorgan Chase headquarters is seen in New York. Sen. Bernie Sanders has said it and other major banks are too big and powerful. Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images

Breaking Up The Banks May Be More Complicated Than It Seems

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A pedestrian walks past the building housing the offices of Mossack Fonseca in Panama City, Panama, on Tuesday. The massive trove of emails, contracts and other papers from the law firm is being called the largest document leak in history. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

Progress Made To Rein In Shell Corporations, But More Action Needed

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