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Sara Murawski, pictured on the patio of her new condo in Portland, Ore., has been dreaming of homeownership for two decades. This year, she became a first-time homebuyer — seeing first hand how Portland's red-hot housing market is starting to cool and become a little friendlier to buyers. Courtesy of Justin Dias hide caption

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Courtesy of Justin Dias

New Homebuyers Face A Friendlier Housing Market, Thanks To Cooldown

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Roman Borisovich is a Russian banker-turned-anti-corruption activist and founder of ClampK, the Campaign for Legislation Against Money-laundering in Property by Kleptocrats. Here Borisovich stands in front of a multi-million dollar London house owned by Dmitry Firtash, a Ukrainian billionaire indicted in the U.S. for money-laundering. Lauren Frayer for NPR hide caption

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Lauren Frayer for NPR

As The Global Rich Buy Up London Homes, Britons Ask If The Money Is Legit

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Luciano Lozano/Getty Images

Forget Generation Rent: More Younger Americans Aim To Buy

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University of Michigan professor Peter Allen lectures to students during his real estate investing course. Jason Margolis/NPR hide caption

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Jason Margolis/NPR

Professor Delivers A Crash Course In Real Estate Investing To Detroiters

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A realty sign in front of a home in The Lakes neighborhood in Las Vegas. Nevada, which was hit hard by the housing bust five years ago, remains the state with the highest number of homes with negative equity. Isaac Brekken/AP hide caption

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Isaac Brekken/AP