Birth Control Birth Control

Wendy Vitter, with her husband, David Vitter, after he was reelected to the Senate in 2010 despite being linked to the "D.C. Madam" scandal. Wendy Vitter is now nominated for a judgeship. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Judicial Nominee Wendy Vitter Gets Tough Questions On Birth Control And Abortion

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Cecile Richards attends the 2017 Glamour Women of the Year Awards at Kings Theatre on Monday, Nov. 13, 2017, in New York. Evan Agostini/Invision/AP hide caption

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Evan Agostini/Invision/AP

The Department of Health and Humans Services is adding a Division of Conscience and Religious Freedom to protect doctors, nurses and other health care workers who refuse to take part in some kinds of care because of moral or religious objections. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Trump Admin Will Protect Health Workers Who Refuse Services On Religious Grounds

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Even Low-Dose Contraceptives Slightly Increase Breast Cancer Risk

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Supporters of women's health rally outside the Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., March 23, 2016, as the Court hears oral arguments in seven cases dealing with religious organizations that want to ban contraceptives from their health insurance policies on religious grounds. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Most employers are likely to continue paying for birth control for women. But there are exceptions. Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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Science Photo Library/Getty Images

The Natural Cycles app was designed by a particle physicist and launched in 2014. It's now been certified as a method of birth control in the E.U. Courtesy of Natural Cycles hide caption

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Courtesy of Natural Cycles

Mobile App Designed To Prevent Pregnancy Gets EU Approval

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Chester with Ivory (left), 11, Skylar (right), 12, and Kameron (center), 21 months. Lauren Silverman/KERA hide caption

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Lauren Silverman/KERA

In Texas, Abstinence-Only Programs May Contribute To Teen Pregnancies

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Birth control pills actually may be safer for teenagers than for older women, a study finds. BSIP/UIG/Getty Images hide caption

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BSIP/UIG/Getty Images

Over-The-Counter Birth Control Pills Would Be Safe For Teens, Researchers Say

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Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte, shown at a news conference at Davao's international airport on Dec. 17, says family planning is critical for reducing poverty. Manman Dejeto/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Manman Dejeto/AFP/Getty Images

Under the Affordable Care Act, insurers are required to cover birth control with no copay. It's unclear what will happen to coverage if the act is repealed or amended. B. Boissonnet/BSIP/Getty Images hide caption

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B. Boissonnet/BSIP/Getty Images

A health care provider interviews a patient at a Planned Parenthood clinic in Boston in 2013. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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Steven Senne/AP

Access To Abortion Could Be Curtailed Under Trump Administration

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