Birth Control Birth Control
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Changing Tack, GOP Candidates Support Over-The-Counter Birth Control

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Exercise helps lower stroke risk, but birth control pills and pregnancy can be problematic for younger women. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Insurers still charge copays for some contraceptives. Laura Garca/iStockphoto hide caption

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Laura Garca/iStockphoto

Estrogen affects cells in the eye's retina, which may help explain a possible link between glaucoma and estrogen levels. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

The Plan B One-Step morning-after pill will now be available to women as young as 15 without a prescription, and will have another three years of protection from generic competition. AP hide caption

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AP

Baltimore Archbishop William Lori gave voice to a letter Catholic groups sent to the administration and Congress to protest insurance rules for contraceptives. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

As Heard On Morning Edition

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White House Tries Again To Find Compromise On Contraception

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