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A screenshot of a map showing case counts of COVID-19 reported in different animal species, part of an interactive COVID data tracking dashboard rendered by Complexity Science Hub Vienna. The drawings represent the type of animal, including both domestic and wild; the size of the bubbles reflects the number of cases in each locale. Complexity Science Hub Vienna/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Complexity Science Hub Vienna/Screenshot by NPR

Two white-tailed deer forage in Pennsylvania's Wyomissing Parklands. At the end of 2021, researchers swabbed the noses of 93 dead deer from across the state. Nearly 20% tested positive for the coronavirus. Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle via Getty Images hide caption

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Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle via Getty Images

Researcher finds 'stunning' rate of COVID among deer. Here's what it means for humans

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A hamster named Marshmallow was dropped off at the New Territories South Animal Management Centre in Hong Kong on Jan. 19 over concerns that pets were spreading the coronavirus to humans. Thousands of small animals were culled after hamsters tested positive in a pet store. Bertha Wang/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Bertha Wang/AFP via Getty Images

Minks look out from a cage after a farm near Naestved, Denmark, was told to kill off its herd Friday. Mads Claus Rasmussen/Ritzau Scanpix/AFP via Getty Ima hide caption

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Mads Claus Rasmussen/Ritzau Scanpix/AFP via Getty Ima

A mink is photographed on a farm in October in Hjoerring, Denmark. The country will cull its population of minks after discovering coronavirus outbreaks. Mads Claus Rasmussen/Ritzau Scanpix/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mads Claus Rasmussen/Ritzau Scanpix/AFP via Getty Images