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In this July 28, 1971 file photo, Daniel Ellsberg, former Defense Department researcher who leaked top-secret Pentagon papers to the press, speaks to an unofficial House panel investigating the significance of the war documents. Anonymous/AP hide caption

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Anonymous/AP

History-making whistleblower Daniel Ellsberg has died at 92

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Officials at the Pentagon attend a virtual meeting of more than 50 nations on the war in Ukraine, on March 15. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Daniel Ellsberg speaks during an interview in Los Angeles on Sept. 23, 2009. Ellsberg, who copied and leaked documents that revealed secret details of U.S. strategy in the Vietnam War and became known as the Pentagon Papers, has announced he has terminal cancer and months to live. Nick Ut/AP hide caption

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Nick Ut/AP

Journalist Neil Sheehan, pictured at the time as a reporter for UPI, died recently at the age of 84. Bettmann/Bettmann Archive hide caption

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Bettmann/Bettmann Archive

Opinion: Remembering Journalist And Friend Neil Sheehan

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The Supreme Court has long upheld the right of access to a wide range of judicial proceedings and records. An order Monday unsealing records in an Alabama death penalty case continued that tradition. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP
AP

Two Lions Of Journalism, Roaring To The Last

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Daniel Ellsberg Expected Life In Prison After Leaking Pentagon Papers

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July 1, 1971: After getting the green light from the Supreme Court, The New York Times resumes publication of its series of articles based on the secret Pentagon Papers. Jim Wells/AP hide caption

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Jim Wells/AP