Puerto Rico Puerto Rico

Dr. Eduardo Ibarra checks the blood pressure of Carmen Garcia Lavoy in the Toa Baja area of Puerto Rico. He's been making house calls in the area with nurse Erika Rodriguez. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Jason Beaubien/NPR

Lingering Power Outage In Puerto Rico Strains Health Care System

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Puerto Rico's governor demanded the cancellation of a controversial $300 million contract with Montana-based Whitefish Energy. More than a month after Hurricane Maria hit, a majority of customers remain without power on the island. Carlos Giusti/AP hide caption

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Carlos Giusti/AP

Whitefish Energy workers restore damaged lines in Barceloneta, Puerto Rico, on Oct. 15. A $300 million contract between the tiny company and Puerto Rico's electric authority has come under intense scrutiny. Ramon Espinosa/AP hide caption

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Ramon Espinosa/AP

Whitefish Energy workers restore power lines damaged in Barceloneta, Puerto Rico, on Oct. 15. Gov. Ricardo Rosselló has ordered an audit of the $300 million deal the island's power authority made with Whitefish. Ramon Espinosa/AP hide caption

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Ramon Espinosa/AP

Volunteers assemble tens of thousands of sandwiches each day at the Coliseo in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Chef José Andrés, who is overseeing the massive effort to feed displaced Puerto Ricans, calls it "one of the most effective sandwich lines made by volunteers in history — I'm so proud of them." Christina Cala/NPR hide caption

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Christina Cala/NPR

Chef José Andrés Has Served Nearly 1.5 Million Meals To Hungry Puerto Ricans

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A worker repairs power lines in San Isidro, Puerto Rico. An outdated, aboveground power grid coupled with a comparative shortage of utility workers have hobbled efforts to restore power in the territory. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Glisela Vega Rivera and her three children wait to board a flight to Miami. Thousands of Puerto Ricans have poured into Florida after Hurricane Maria. More than 27,000 have arrived through Port Everglades and the Miami and Orlando airports alone since Oct. 3, according to the governor's office. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

President Trump walks with FEMA administrator Brock Long (second from right) and Lt. Gen. Jeff Buchanan (right) as he tours an area affected by Hurricane Maria in Guaynabo, Puerto Rico, on Oct. 3. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Residents handle aftermath of hurricane with resilience, humor and spirit. Jaylyn Rosario stands on makeshift barrier to prevent flooding of her home on Avenida Esteves, piled high with sand and debris washed in from a creek. Carol Guzy for NPR hide caption

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Carol Guzy for NPR