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Two people swim at a beach in Vieques, Puerto Rico. One of the bays on the island is famous for its bioluminescent plankton, which are slowly recovering after Hurricane Maria. Ricardo Arduengo for NPR hide caption

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Ricardo Arduengo for NPR

After Maria, One Of The World's Best Bioluminescent Bays Slowly Begins To Glow Again

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Miosotis Castro, her husband Francisco Alvarado and their three children lost their home when Hurricane Maria tore through Puerto Rico in September. Eventually they made their way to Providence, Rhode Island, where they've been living with relatives for the last month. John Bender hide caption

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John Bender

For Puerto Ricans Displaced By Maria, A First Christmas Away From Home

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Puerto Rican coquito is traditionally made with a blend of coconut milk, rum and cinammon. The creamy, boozy rum punch is a holiday favorite to sip and to share this time of year. Matthew Mead/AP hide caption

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Matthew Mead/AP

It's Competition Season For Coquito, Puerto Rico's Boozy Holiday Treat

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Puerto Rican merengue singer Joseph Fonseca says he wrote a holiday song about generators to bring joy to people suffering through a long hurricane recovery that has left thousands dependent on generators for power. Daniella Cheslow for NPR hide caption

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Daniella Cheslow for NPR

In Puerto Rico, A Generator's Buzz Powers One Singer's Musical Imagination

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A child rides a bike by a house destroyed by Hurricane Maria in Vieques, Puerto Rico. Ricardo Arduengo for NPR hide caption

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Ricardo Arduengo for NPR

Puerto Rican Island 'Still In Crisis Mode' 3 Months After Maria

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A musical group playing traditional Puerto Rican bomba music performs at a parranda in Hartford, Conn. Ryan Caron King for NPR hide caption

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Ryan Caron King for NPR

'We Feel Like Home': Displaced Puerto Ricans Celebrate Traditional Christmas Parranda

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Hurricane María's 150-mph winds destroyed the tropical rainforest's canopy and stripped trees bare. Scientists believe as many as one-fifth of the forest's trees may eventually die from the storm's effects. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

Post-María, A Key Ecosystem In Puerto Rico Faces Slow Recovery

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At the Casa Histórica de la Música Cayeyana — a non-profit house of music in Cayey — people come together on the weekends to sing, dance, and recite poetry. Ryan Caron King/WNPR hide caption

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Ryan Caron King/WNPR

The active part of the landfill in Toa Baja is currently a hot, rancid, open dump. Federal regulations require trash piles to be covered daily with earth. But the site's supervisor says that's currently impossible. José Jiménez-Tirado for NPR hide caption

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José Jiménez-Tirado for NPR

After Maria, Puerto Rico Struggles Under The Weight Of Its Own Garbage

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Children in the mountain town of Orocovis returned to school two weeks ago after a two-month pause following Hurricane Maria. The school doesn't have electricity, so it lets out at 12:30 p.m. Ryan Caron King/WNPR hide caption

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Ryan Caron King/WNPR

Irma Rivera Aviles and her husband, Ivan Martínez, stand in front of their home last month. Rivera Aviles was ecstatic about the restoration of power to her neighborhood last Friday. Marisa Penaloza/NPR hide caption

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Marisa Penaloza/NPR

Irma Rivera Aviles and her husband Ivan Martínez live in a tight-knit working-class community called El Pueblito in Cataño. Their community flooded during Hurricane Maria leaving their house damaged with a hole in the roof. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

'We Don't Feel Safe Here': Building A Post-Hurricane Life In Puerto Rico

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The hurricane knocked out power to millions and destroyed water infrastructure. It also tore up plants across the island, washed soil off fields and knocked down fences. Carlos Giusti/AP hide caption

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Carlos Giusti/AP

Puerto Rico's Hurricane Recovery Hinders Farm Businesses' Seed Research

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