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Puerto Rico

A doctor walks through a hallway at the Centro Medico trauma center in San Juan, Puerto Rico, in 2013. A medical exodus has been taking place for a decade in the Caribbean territory as doctors and nurses flee for the U.S. mainland, seeking higher salaries and better reimbursements from insurers. Ricardo Arduengo/AP hide caption

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Ricardo Arduengo/AP

SOS: Puerto Rico Is Losing Doctors, Leaving Patients Stranded

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Blue skies in San Juan, Puerto Rico belie the U.S. territory's struggle with massive debt. The islands have a generous health care program that covers nearly everyone, but economists say it has never been adequately funded. Christopher Gregory/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Christopher Gregory/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Puerto Rico's Growing Financial Crisis Threatens Health Care, Too

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Mosquito larvae fill the cup of stale water that entomologist Luis Hernandez dips from a stack of old tires in a suburb of San Juan, Puerto Rico. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

Puerto Rico Races To Stop Zika's Mosquitoes Before Rains Begin

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Previous experience with dengue outbreaks in Puerto Rico has shown that even small amounts of standing water — as in the vases of cemeteries — can serve as breeding areas for the mosquitoes that carry dengue and Zika. Pan American Health Organization/Flickr hide caption

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Pan American Health Organization/Flickr

With CDC Help, Puerto Rico Aims To Get Ahead Of Zika

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Aedes aegypti mosquitoes are displayed at an exhibition on Jan. 28 in Brazil. The mosquitoes can be carriers of the Zika virus. Several cases of the virus have spread to Puerto Rico. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Puerto Rico Health Official 'Very Concerned' About Zika's Spread

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Puerto Rico faces a financial crisis with a debt of $72 billion. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

As Debt Talks Hit An Impasse, What's Next For Puerto Rico?

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One of the banana plants in the collection at the USDA's Tropical Agriculture Research Station in Puerto Rico. It's just one of many banana collections around the world that might just hold the key to stopping a fungus's deadly reach. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Our Favorite Banana May Be Doomed; Can New Varieties Replace It?

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Puerto Rico's governor, Alejandro Javier Garcia Padilla, shown here in an appearance in Washington this month, has been urging Congress to allow the commonwealth to seek bankruptcy protection. Sait Serkan Gurbuz/AP hide caption

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Sait Serkan Gurbuz/AP

The Puerto Rican capitol building in San Juan is seen on July 1, 2015. The island's residents are struggling to cope with the government's $72 billion debt. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

A woman walks in front of a business with the municipal flag painted on the entrance doors in Lares, Puerto Rico, on Sept. 2, 2015. Puerto Rico's economy has been struggling, and Puerto Ricans living on the U.S. mainland, who can vote, vow to be heard this election in an effort to help the ailing U.S. territory. Ricardo Arduengo/AP hide caption

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Ricardo Arduengo/AP

Puerto Ricans Vow To Have A Bigger Voice In 2016 Election

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