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Hurricane Maria cut power to people across Puerto Rico. On Wednesday, a subcontracting company caused another island-wide blackout, which the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority has been working to fix. Ramon Espinosa/AP hide caption

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Ramon Espinosa/AP

In the aftermath of Hurricane Maria, restorations are being made to a roof in Castañer, a village in Puerto Rico's central mountains. But recovery is slow. Sarah Varney/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Sarah Varney/Kaiser Health News

In A Puerto Rican Mountain Town, Hope Ebbs As The Hardship Continues

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Contractors working to restore power in Cayey, Puerto Rico, last week, the same region where a falling tree interrupted a main transmission line Thursday, plunging 840,000 customers into darkness. Adrian Florido/NPR hide caption

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Adrian Florido/NPR

Larry Dimas walks around his destroyed trailer in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma in Immokalee, Fla., on Sept. 11, 2017. The World Meteorological Organization will no longer use Harvey, Irma, Maria and Nate to name hurricanes. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

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Gerald Herbert/AP

After a lifetime of agricultural work on the U.S. mainland, Ausberto Maldonado retired home to a suburb of San Juan, Puerto Rico. But he has diabetes, and especially since Hurricane Maria, has been struggling to get by. Sarah Varney/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Sarah Varney/Kaiser Health News

Time's Running Out For Many Frail, Older People In Puerto Rico

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Puerto Rico Gov. Ricardo Rossello and U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin announced a deal that would allow billions of dollars in federal disaster recovery loans to start flowing to the hurricane-devastated island. La Fortaleza hide caption

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La Fortaleza

Feds And Puerto Rico Reach Deal Allowing Disaster Recovery Loans To Start Flowing

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Dr. Carla Rossotti (left), a general practitioner, and her health care team leave the home of the their patient, 37-year-old Osvaldo Daniel Martinez. He has the symptoms of a degenerative disease, Rossotti says, but he needs a neurologist's evaluation before he can get proper treatment. Sarah Varney/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Sarah Varney/Kaiser Health News

For One Father And Son In Puerto Rico, A Storm Was Just The Latest Trial

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Von Diaz drew on her experiences in her grandmother's Puerto Rican kitchen and her Southeastern American roots to write her cookbook, Coconuts and Collards. Ella Colley /University Press of Florida hide caption

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Ella Colley /University Press of Florida

Puerto Rican Cooking And The American South Mix In 'Coconuts And Collards'

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Gabriel Hernandez (left) and Jose Enrique are Puerto Rican chefs named as semifinalists for the best chef of the South category of the 2018 James Beard Awards. The recognition comes as the island's restaurants recover from Hurricane Maria. Daniella Cheslow/NPR; Astrid Stawiarz/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniella Cheslow/NPR; Astrid Stawiarz/Getty Images

A U.S. Army soldier unloads a shipment of water provided by FEMA as a resident walks past in San Isidro, Puerto Rico. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

FEMA To End Food And Water Aid For Puerto Rico

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In a photograph taken in October, a resident tries to connect electrical lines downed by Hurricane Maria in preparation for when electricity is restored in Toa Baja, Puerto Rico. Ramon Espinosa/AP hide caption

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Ramon Espinosa/AP