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In October 2017, a resident tries to connect electrical lines downed by Hurricane Maria in Toa Baja. Puerto Rican officials say electricity has returned to all residents without it after the hurricane. Ramon Espinosa/AP hide caption

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Ramon Espinosa/AP

In this June 13 photo, a residence in the Figueroa neighborhood stands destroyed nine months after Hurricane Maria, in San Juan, Puerto Rico. On Wednesday a federal judge extended a temporary housing program for territory residents whose homes were destroyed. Carlos Giusti/AP hide caption

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Carlos Giusti/AP

In the mountain town of Juyaya, Puerto Rico, last October, children watched as U.S. Army helicopters brought a team of physicians to assess the medical needs of the local hospital and residents. Going forward, health economists say, the U.S. territory will need continued federal help to deal with its overwhelming Medicaid expenses. Carolyn Cole/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Carolyn Cole/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

U.S. Army soldiers pass out water, provided by FEMA, to residents in a neighborhood without grid electricity or running water in San Isidro, Puerto Rico, on Oct. 17, 2017. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Puerto Rico Gov. Ricardo Rosselló, right, speaks during a ceremony on Capitol Hill on June 27, 2018. On Thursday, Rosselló demanded the resignation of any member of PREPA's board who refused to cut the new CEO's $750,000 salary. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

A building for sale in the town of Isabel Segunda in Vieques. Ryan Caron King/Connecticut Public Radio hide caption

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Ryan Caron King/Connecticut Public Radio

Vieques Still Finding Its Footing After Hurricane Destruction

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A May 2016 photo provided by the Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez campaign shows the candidate during a Bengali community outreach event in New York. Corey Torpie/AP hide caption

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Corey Torpie/AP

Who Is Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez?

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Puerto Rican residents received food and water from FEMA after Hurricane Maria, but many complained that some boxes were stuffed with candy and salty snacks, not meals. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Florida Gov. Rick Scott joined a January event on the ongoing relief efforts for those affected by Hurricane Maria in Florida and Puerto Rico. With a growing bloc of voters from the island in Florida, the Republican Scott and Democratic Sen. Bill Nelson have been attacking each other over the issue of relief efforts in Puerto Rico in their high-stakes Senate campaign. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

At Issue In Florida Senate Campaign: Who's Fighting For Puerto Rico?

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Puerto Rican Nerybelle Perez poses with a portrait of her father, World War II veteran Efrain Perez, who died after his ambulance was turned away from the island's largest public hospital when it had no electricity or water following Hurricane Maria. Carlos Giusti/AP hide caption

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Carlos Giusti/AP

Nine days after the Hurricane Maria struck, Emilú De León and other volunteers opened a kitchen to serve meals to the people of Caguas. The first day, they fed 600, De León says. Jenna Miller/Cronkite Borderlands Project hide caption

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Jenna Miller/Cronkite Borderlands Project

Jose Javier Santana says this torn and frayed Puerto Rican flag is representative of the state of the island now — eight months after Hurricane Maria hit. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Study Estimates Hurricane Maria Killed Nearly 5,000, But Barely Makes News

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Luis Vázquez placed his shoes at the memorial in remembrance of his father, Luis Manuel Vázquez, who was found dead in his home two weeks after Hurricane Maria. Adrian Florido/NPR hide caption

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Adrian Florido/NPR