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The FAA approved a Pulse Vapor drone like this one — but outfitted with LTE radios and antennas — to provide temporary voice, data, and internet service in Puerto Rico. Mary Esch/AP hide caption

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Mary Esch/AP

MedStar Health clinic in Washington, D.C. An affiliated MedStar hospital is just one of many facilities throughout the U.S. that have been hit with shortages of certain medications because of recent hurricane damage to manufacturers in Puerto Rico. Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Hurricane Damage To Manufacturers In Puerto Rico Affects Mainland Hospitals, Too

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Roberto Fret, 54, stands in the backyard of his damaged home. Hurricane Maria blew the roof off the house; the wind was so powerful that it twisted the metal roofing material and scattered pieces of it all over the yard. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

Thousands Of Puerto Ricans Are Still In Shelters. Now What?

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Education Secretary Betsy DeVos (right) toured public schools in Puerto Rico this week with Puerto Rico Secretary of Education Dr. Julia Keleher (left) and Puerto Rico Gov. Ricardo Rosselló (second from left). Courtesy of the Puerto Rico Department of Eduaction hide caption

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Courtesy of the Puerto Rico Department of Eduaction

Two evacuees look out from the entrance of the Luis Muñoz Marín public school last week in Barranquitas, Puerto Rico. Many people from Barranquitas have been living in a shelter set up in the school since Hurricane Maria destroyed their homes in September. Ricardo Arduengo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ricardo Arduengo/AFP/Getty Images

Army Reserve troops have been distributing water and other supplies in Morovis since Hurricane Maria struck more than six weeks ago. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

Frustration Mounts Over Puerto Rico's 'New Normal' As Federal Troops Leave The Island

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Puerto Ricans who could find a TV screen connected to a generator and a satellite link took advantage of the final game of the World Series to get a much needed diversion. Six weeks after Hurricane Maria, only about a third of the territory has power. Quil Lawrence/NPR hide caption

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Quil Lawrence/NPR

Dr. Eduardo Ibarra checks the blood pressure of Carmen Garcia Lavoy in the Toa Baja area of Puerto Rico. He's been making house calls in the area with nurse Erika Rodriguez. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Jason Beaubien/NPR

Lingering Power Outage In Puerto Rico Strains Health Care System

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Puerto Rico's governor demanded the cancellation of a controversial $300 million contract with Montana-based Whitefish Energy. More than a month after Hurricane Maria hit, a majority of customers remain without power on the island. Carlos Giusti/AP hide caption

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Carlos Giusti/AP

Whitefish Energy workers restore damaged lines in Barceloneta, Puerto Rico, on Oct. 15. A $300 million contract between the tiny company and Puerto Rico's electric authority has come under intense scrutiny. Ramon Espinosa/AP hide caption

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Ramon Espinosa/AP