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pesticides

Bedbugs aren't known to spread disease to or among people, but that doesn't make them less creepy-crawly. About the size of an apple seed, they feast on human blood and typically bite a sleeping host at night. Josh Cassidy/KQED hide caption

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Josh Cassidy/KQED

These Palmer amaranth — or pigweed — plants, seen growing in a greenhouse at Kansas State University, appear to be resistant to multiple herbicides. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

As Weeds Outsmart The Latest Weedkillers, Farmers Are Running Out Of Easy Options

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A pesticide warning sign in an orange grove warns in English and Spanish that the pesticide chlorpyrifos, or Lorsban, has been applied to these orange trees. Jim West/Science Source hide caption

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Jim West/Science Source

Will An Appeals Court Make The EPA Ban A Pesticide Linked To Serious Health Risks?

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The alkali bee is slightly smaller than a honey bee, with opalescent stripes that shimmer between yellow, green, red and blue. Aaron Scott/Oregon Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Aaron Scott/Oregon Public Broadcasting

When ticks come into contact with clothing sprayed with permethrin, research shows, they quickly become incapacitated and are unable to bite. Pearl Mak/NPR hide caption

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Pearl Mak/NPR

To Repel Ticks, Try Spraying Your Clothes With A Pesticide That Mimics Mums

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Ray Vester served on the Arkansas State Plant Board for 18 years. "It's self-governing, by the people, for the people," he says. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

These Citizen-Regulators In Arkansas Defied Monsanto. Now They're Under Attack

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Tea pickers stand in the scorching sun, hand-plucking the tea leaves for about eight hours a day. Furkan Latif Khan/NPR hide caption

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Furkan Latif Khan/NPR

Tea Farmer In India Leads Charge For Organic, Evades The Charge Of Elephants

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The destructive diamondback moth has spread across the world and mutated to become immune to each new chemical pesticide designed to slay it. Jonathan Lewis/Getty Images hide caption

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Jonathan Lewis/Getty Images

A sprayer covers a soybean field with an herbicide to control weeds. Scott Sinklier/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Sinklier/Getty Images

Damage From Wayward Weedkiller Keeps Growing

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