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A service dog named Orlando rests on the foot of its trainer, John Reddan, while sitting inside a United Airlines plane at Newark Liberty International Airport during a training exercise last year. United Airlines wants to see more paperwork before passengers fly with an emotional support animal. Julio Cortez/AP hide caption

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Julio Cortez/AP

Lucy and Ethel stand next to the charred ruins of Josh Weil and Claire Mollard's home in Santa Rosa, Calif. Someone, likely firefighters, gave the goats a bowl of water. Courtesy of Josh Weil hide caption

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Courtesy of Josh Weil

Adult female with young male coming in (without collar) to her kill. Mark Elbroch/Panthera/Science hide caption

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Mark Elbroch/Panthera/Science

Pumas Are Not Such Loners After All

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New York's Guggenheim Museum announced Monday that it was removing three works from its upcoming exhibit of contemporary art from China. Animal rights activists said the works depicted cruelty to animals. Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images

A map in Where the Animals Go shows how baboons move near the Mpala Research Centre in Kenya, as tracked by anthropologist Margaret Crofoot and her colleagues in 2012. Margaret Crofoot, University of California, Davis; Damien Farine, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology /Courtesy of Oliver Uberti hide caption

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Margaret Crofoot, University of California, Davis; Damien Farine, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology /Courtesy of Oliver Uberti

Ken Catania of Vanderbilt University lets a small eel zap his arm as he holds a device he designed to measure the strength of the electric current. Ken Catania hide caption

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Ken Catania

It's Like An 'Electric-Fence Sensation,' Says Scientist Who Let An Eel Shock His Arm

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More than 50 Caribbean flamingos take shelter in a men's restroom at the Miami Metrozoo (now Zoo Miami) on Sept. 25, 1998. Zookeepers rounded up the birds to protect them from the effects of Hurricane Georges. This was not the first time the zoo had to corral flamingos in a restroom. They were also in there during Hurricane Andrew, six years earlier. Max Trujillo/Getty Images hide caption

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Max Trujillo/Getty Images