animals animals

Rogers hand feeds June, a 300-plus-pound pregnant black bear. Derek Montgomery for NPR hide caption

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Derek Montgomery for NPR

Invisibilia: Should Wild Bears Be Feared Or Befriended?

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A blue whale, the largest animal on the planet, engulfs krill off the coast of California. Silverback Films/BBC/Proceedings of the Royal Society B hide caption

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Silverback Films/BBC/Proceedings of the Royal Society B

How The Biggest Animal On Earth Got So Big

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A mother and calf humpback whale swim in the Exmouth Gulf in Western Australia. Fredrik Christiansen/Functional Ecology hide caption

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Fredrik Christiansen/Functional Ecology

Recordings Reveal That Baby Humpback Whales 'Whisper' To Their Mothers

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Say what you will about naked mole-rats, but their bodies have a trick that lets them survive periods of oxygen deprivation. Roland Gockel/Max Delbruck Center for Molecular Medicine hide caption

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Roland Gockel/Max Delbruck Center for Molecular Medicine

Researchers Find Yet Another Reason Why Naked Mole-Rats Are Just Weird

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An Army horse wears a gas mask to guard against German gas attacks. Courtesy of U.S. National Archives hide caption

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Courtesy of U.S. National Archives

The Unsung Equestrian Heroes Of World War I And The Plot To Poison Them

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In a photograph taken Saturday, volunteers prop up a pilot whale at Farewell Spit in New Zealand. Overnight, more than 200 of the stranded whales returned to the sea. Marty Melville/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Marty Melville/AFP/Getty Images