hepatitis C hepatitis C

In two recent clinical trials of Harvoni and Sovaldi in the treatment of young people between the ages of 12 and 17, the drugs eliminated all traces of the hepatitis C virus in 97 to 100 percent of patients, generally in 12 weeks. Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images

Gilead Sciences' Harvoni can cure hepatitis C, but the drug costs a fortune. Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images

Army Specialist Jim McGough with members of his unit in 1971. Then 19, he was photographed by a columnist from The Des Moines Register. Gordon Gammack/The Des Moines Register hide caption

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Gordon Gammack/The Des Moines Register

New drugs like Harvoni effectively cure hepatitis C, but they haven't yet been approved for use in children. Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images

Harvoni can cure hepatitis C, but the drug costs a fortune. Are loans to patients the answer? Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images

A 12-week regimen of Harvoni is 90 percent effective in curing an infection with hepatitis C, doctors say. It also costs about $95,000. Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images

States Deny Pricey Hepatitis C Drugs To Most Medicaid Patients

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A recent analysis by the Kaiser Family Foundation finds that Medicare recipients taking Revlimid for cancer could end up paying, on average, $11,538 out of pocket for the drug in 2016, even if the medicine is covered by their Medicare Part D plan. Carmine Galasso/MCT/Landov hide caption

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Carmine Galasso/MCT/Landov

Retired California school teacher Mikkel Lawrence sits with his cat, Max. Lawrence has hepatitis C and has struggled to afford the medicine he needs to treat it. April Dembosky/KQED hide caption

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April Dembosky/KQED

Austin, Indiana's needle exchange program is open for business this week, but health workers worry the program will be tough to quickly replicate in other counties. Darron Cummings/AP hide caption

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Darron Cummings/AP

Indiana Struggles To Control HIV Outbreak Linked To Injected Drug Use

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Volunteer Patrick Pezzati searches yards in Turners Falls, Mass., for discarded heroin needles. Karen Brown/WFCR hide caption

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Karen Brown/WFCR

A Rural Police Chief Asks Citizens To Help Pick Up Used Syringes

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Volunteers search for needles and other drug paraphernalia along Church Street in Austin, Ind., in April. The region has recorded 142 new HIV cases since December, according to the state, in an outbreak tied to injected-opioid use. Seth Herald/Nurphoto/Corbis hide caption

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Seth Herald/Nurphoto/Corbis

CDC Warns More HIV, Hepatitis C Outbreaks Likely Among Drug Users

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