hepatitis C hepatitis C
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hepatitis C

Paul Blow for NPR

Investigation: Patients' Drug Options Under Medicaid Heavily Influenced By Drugmakers

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Hepatitis C virus is typically transmitted through blood, but an infected person who spits at someone can run afoul of the law in some jurisdictions. James Cavallini/Science Source hide caption

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James Cavallini/Science Source

Dr. Ronald Cirillo helps Deborah Hatfield fill out paperwork at a Florida clinic, before running a test to see whether she has hepatitis C. Daylina Miller/Health News Florida hide caption

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Daylina Miller/Health News Florida

From Retirement To The Front Lines Of Hepatitis C Treatment

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Hepatitis C virus, via transmission electron microscopy. (The actual viral diameter is around 22 nm.) Doctors say the recent FDA approval of Mavyret, a less expensive drug for treating the virus, may make it easier for more insurers and correctional facilities to expand treatment. James Cavallini/Science Source hide caption

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James Cavallini/Science Source

Vicki Reid, right, holds a likeness of John Martin, who was then CEO of the pharmaceutical company Gilead Sciences. Reid and others were protesting high drug prices in front of the conference on retroviruses and opportunistic infections — a meeting held at the World Congress Center in Atlanta in March 2013. John Amis/AP Images for AIDS Healthcare Foundation hide caption

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John Amis/AP Images for AIDS Healthcare Foundation

As Cost Of U.S. Health Care Skyrockets, So Does Pay Of Health Care CEOs

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Indiana State Health Commissioner Dr. Jerome Adams is President Trump's nominee for U.S. Surgeon General. Darron Cummings/AP hide caption

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Darron Cummings/AP

Used syringes rest in a pile at a needle exchange clinic in St. Johnsbury, Vt. The CDC says needle exchanges like this one, where users can obtain clean needles, help reduce the rates of death and transmission among those suffering from hepatitis C. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

In two recent clinical trials of Harvoni and Sovaldi in the treatment of young people between the ages of 12 and 17, the drugs eliminated all traces of the hepatitis C virus in 97 to 100 percent of patients, generally in 12 weeks. Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images

Gilead Sciences' Harvoni can cure hepatitis C, but the drug costs a fortune. Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images

Army Specialist Jim McGough with members of his unit in 1971. Then 19, he was photographed by a columnist from The Des Moines Register. Gordon Gammack/The Des Moines Register hide caption

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Gordon Gammack/The Des Moines Register

New drugs like Harvoni effectively cure hepatitis C, but they haven't yet been approved for use in children. Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images

Harvoni can cure hepatitis C, but the drug costs a fortune. Are loans to patients the answer? Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images