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This June 13, 2013 file photo shows the Activision Blizzard Booth during the Electronic Entertainment Expo in Los Angeles. Activision Blizzard is one of the world's most high-profile video game companies. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

A UPS driver stops at a traffic light on April 24 in St. Louis. UPS employees are now allowed to grow their beards as the company loosens up on its appearance rules. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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Jeff Roberson/AP

JPMorgan Chase will pay $5 million to hundreds, possibly thousands, of men who filed for primary caregiver leave and were denied in the last seven years. Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images

A Dad Wins Fight To Increase Parental Leave For Men At JPMorgan Chase

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Bailey Davis, a former cheerleader for the New Orleans Saints, appears on Megyn Kelly TODAY on March 28. Davis was fired from the Saintsations after posting a photo of herself wearing a one-piece bodysuit on her private Instagram account. Nathan Congleton/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images hide caption

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Nathan Congleton/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images

An NFL Cheerleader Brings Her Firing Over An Instagram Photo To The EEOC

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In its report on harassment last year, the EEOC admitted, flat out, that the last three decades of sexual harassment training haven't worked. F64/Getty Images hide caption

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F64/Getty Images

Trainers, Lawyers Say Sexual Harassment Training Fails

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Workers pull pipes from an oil well in 2016 near Crescent, Okla. The oil industry wants to attract a new, more diverse generation of workers, but a history of racism and sexism makes that difficult. J Pat Carter/Getty Images hide caption

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J Pat Carter/Getty Images

Big Oil Has A Diversity Problem

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Advice For Dealing With Workplace Retaliation: Save Those Nasty Emails

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Federal, State Moves Aim To Protect LGBT Workers

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Elizabeth Cadle of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission answers questions on Feb. 16 about the $1 million settlement of a lawsuit against Vail Run Resort. John Leyba/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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John Leyba/Denver Post via Getty Images

Underreporting Makes Sexual Violence At Work Difficult To Address

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President Obama speaks about the gap in pay between men and women on Friday, as he introduced a new proposal that would require large companies to disclose data about employee pay by race, gender and ethnicity. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Carly Medosch has conditions that cause intense fatigue and chronic pain. She took part in a 2014 Stanford Medicine X conference that included discussion of "invisible" illnesses. Yuto Watanabe/Stanford Medicine X hide caption

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Yuto Watanabe/Stanford Medicine X

People With 'Invisible Disabilities' Fight For Understanding

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