Afghan women Afghan women
Stories About

Afghan women

"What makes me hopeful about women's rights in Afghanistan is that women themselves, they have their own voice," Roya Rahmani, Afghanistan's ambassador to the U.S., tells NPR. Amr Alfiky/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Amr Alfiky/NPR

A boy holds the burqa of his mother as they walk down a street in the old city of Kabul on November 1, 2009. Nicolas Asfouri/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Nicolas Asfouri/AFP/Getty Images

Opinion: As U.S. Seeks To Withdraw Troops, What About Afghanistan's Women?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/690857773/690916840" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Lubna Olayan in her office at Olayan Financing Company in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, in April. Fatma Tanis/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Fatma Tanis/NPR

Lubna Olayan Broke Saudi Arabia's Glass Ceiling. Now She Wants More Women To Work

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/606592459/607395925" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A group of Afghan women are attempting to reach the 24,580-foot summit this summer. In mid-May, two of the climbers, along with two American chaperones, visited Afghanistan's highest mountain to see the terrain firsthand in preparation for the historic climb. Soraya Sarhaddi-Nelson/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Soraya Sarhaddi-Nelson/NPR

For Afghan Women Mountaineers, Uphill Battles Begin Before The Climb

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/411699996/413069610" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Sandra Calligaro for NPR

The Ascent Of Afghan Women

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/393900537/396505330" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

At the Romez Store in Kabul, brides-to-be can place custom orders for dresses costing upwards of $900, which is three times the average monthly wage in Afghanistan. Sean Carberry/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Sean Carberry/NPR

Afghan Brides Dress To Impress, Fueling An Unlikely Business Boom

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/338863584/339292682" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The women of the Afghan National Cycling Federation team train outside Kabul, the capital. They face poor road conditions, terrible traffic, lots of gawking and even threats of violence in pursuit of their sport. Peter Breslow/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Peter Breslow/NPR

Afghan Female Cyclists: Breaking Away, And Breaking Taboos

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/308353109/308899344" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

June 4, 2011: women and girls at a literacy class in Anjil, Afghanistan. AP hide caption

toggle caption
AP

Gayle Tzemach Lemmon

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/137368304/137368587" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">