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To Control Wildfires, Western Officials Are Urged To Follow South's Lead

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Bob Wilson, a San Diego real estate developer and restaurant owner, hands out $1,000 checks to students and staff from Paradise High School on Tuesday evening in Chico, Calif. The town of Paradise was largely destroyed by a wildfire this month. Loren Lighthall/AP hide caption

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Loren Lighthall/AP

A member of a search and rescue team combs the ruins of a mobile home park Wednesday in Paradise, Calif. Hundreds of people remain missing, and survivors are struggling to cope with life after escaping the Camp Fire. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Mourners pray for the victims of the Camp Fire during a vigil Sunday in Chico, Calif. The wildfire killed dozens of people and effectively wiped the entire town of Paradise off the map. Noah Berger/AP hide caption

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Noah Berger/AP

The wreckage of a house sitting in Thousand Oaks, Calif., a city ravaged by the Woolsey Fire less than a day after a mass shooting. Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

Firefighters try to beat back the Woolsey Fire in the early hours of Friday. One day earlier, the blaze ignited as mourning residents tried to cope with quite another kind of terror in Thousand Oaks, Calif. Eric Thayer/Reuters hide caption

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Eric Thayer/Reuters

A North Carolina resident sits on his staircase earlier this week, staring into the water that surrounded his home after Florence hit Emerald Isle, N.C. Tom Copeland/AP hide caption

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Tom Copeland/AP

Footing The Bill For Climate Change: 'By The End Of The Day, Someone Has To Pay'

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Firefighters work on the Ranch Fire, part of the Mendocino Complex Fire on Aug. 7. On Thursday Cal Fire asked state lawmakers for an additional $234 million in funding to continue battling wildfires through the end of the year. Noah Berger/AP hide caption

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Noah Berger/AP

Workers in dust masks wash fresh red bell peppers in smoky conditions outside of Eltopia, Wash. Even with the masks, the smoke is still causing tight chests, itchy eyes and dry throats. Anna King/Northwest News Network hide caption

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Anna King/Northwest News Network

As Wildfires Rage, Smoke Chokes Out Farmworkers And Delays Some Crops

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This still frame from a video released earlier this week by Cal Fire shows the "fire tornado" forming over Lake Keswick Estates near Redding, Calif., on July 26. Cal Fire via AP hide caption

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Cal Fire via AP

A car passes through flames on Highway 299 as the Carr Fire burns through Shasta, Calif., on July 26. Fueled by high temperatures, wind and low humidity, the blaze has destroyed multiple structures and killed seven people. Noah Berger/AP hide caption

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Noah Berger/AP

A woman uses a portable fan to cool herself in Tokyo on Tuesday as Japan suffers from a heat wave. Scientists say extreme weather events will likely happen more often as the planet gets warmer. Martin Bureau/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Martin Bureau/AFP/Getty Images

When The Weather Is Extreme, Is Climate Change To Blame?

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The Eagle Creek wildfire burns in the Columbia River Gorge east of Portland, Ore., in September. The teenager who threw the firework that started the fire has been ordered to pay $36.6 million to victims who suffered damages. Inciweb/AP hide caption

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Inciweb/AP

Echo, an English Labrador, narrows down the search for the ashes of Kathy Lampi's mother. She died in June, but her cremains were lost in the wildfire in October. Thomas Nash/nashpix.com hide caption

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Thomas Nash/nashpix.com

Forensic Search Dogs Sniff Out Human Ashes In Wildfire Wreckage

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2 Weeks In, Firefighters Battle To Save Homes From Southern California Wildfires

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A firefighter douses flames around a house that was saved while the property around it burned as winds picked up and pushed the fire west Saturday in Montecito, Calif. Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images

Smoke from wildfires, like this lingering cloud in Sonoma County, Calif., in October, may be responsible for creating an off taste in wine. George Rose/Getty Images hide caption

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George Rose/Getty Images