hospice hospice

Earl Borges, now 70, conducted river patrols in the Navy during the Vietnam War. These days, he says, symptoms from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and ALS can intensify the anxiety he experiences as a result of PTSD. Courtesy of Shirley Borges hide caption

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Courtesy of Shirley Borges

Helping her father die at home "was the most meaningful experience in my nursing career," said Rose Crumb. She went on to found Volunteer Hospice of Clallam County in Port Angeles, Wash. Dan DeLong for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Dan DeLong for Kaiser Health News

A recent study shows a link between high discharge rates for live patients and hospice profit margins. Gary Waters/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Gary Waters/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Nearly 1 In 5 Hospice Patients Discharged While Still Alive

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The Rev. Noel Hickie was working as a hospital chaplain when he met Marcia Hilton, a bereavement counselor at a hospital in Eugene, Ore. For 25 years they often worked together on hospice teams. Courtesy of StoryCorps hide caption

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Courtesy of StoryCorps

For Decades These Caregivers Helped Patients, Families Through Illness And Death

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As baby boomers age, more older Americans are visiting the emergency room, which can be an overcrowded, disorienting and even traumatic place. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

At Gerald Chinchar's home in San Diego, Calif., Nurse Sheri Juan (right) checks his arm for edema that might be a sign that his congestive heart failure is getting worse. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

For Some, Pre-Hospice Care Can Be A Good Alternative To Hospitals

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"It's easier to sort of face the hard things in your life when you're not alone," says hospice chaplain Kerry Egan. "That's a big part of what a chaplain does, is she stays with you." Ann Summa/Getty Images hide caption

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Ann Summa/Getty Images

Hospice Chaplain Reflects On Life, Death And The 'Strength Of The Human Soul'

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Debbie Ziegler holds a photo of her late daughter, Brittany Maynard, while speaking to the media in September after the passage of California's End Of Life Option Act. Maynard was an advocate for the law. Carl Costas/AP hide caption

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Carl Costas/AP

Christy O'Donnell, who has advanced lung cancer, is one of several California patients suing for the right to get a doctor's help with prescription medicine to end their own lives if and when they feel that's necessary. YouTube hide caption

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YouTube

Nora Zamichow says if she and her husband, Mark Saylor, had known how doctors die, they might have made different treatment decisions for him toward the end of his life. Maya Sugarman/KPCC hide caption

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Maya Sugarman/KPCC

Knowing How Doctors Die Can Change End-Of-Life Discussions

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Hawaii ranks 49th in the nation for use of home health care services during the last six months of someone's life. Videos from ACP Decisions show patients what their options are at the end of life. ACP Decisions hide caption

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ACP Decisions

Videos On End-Of-Life Choices Ease Tough Conversation

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Sandra Lopez (left) and her dog, Coco, greet hospice nurse Heather Meyerend last fall. In the weeks before Lopez died, Meyerend stopped by weekly to check her physical health, pain levels and medications. Amy Pearl/WNYC hide caption

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Amy Pearl/WNYC

Too Little, Too Late For Many New Yorkers Seeking Hospice

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