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A woman on the L train in New York City last week covers her face, fearful because a doctor with Ebola rode the train days earlier. Epidemiologists say people on the subway were not at risk. Stephen Nessen /WNYC hide caption

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Stephen Nessen /WNYC

New York's Disease Detectives Hit The Street In Search Of Ebola

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Scenes from an outbreak: Ebola survivor Dr. Kent Brantly; Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas; A worker cleans the apartment where Ebola victim Thomas Eric Duncan stayed in Dallas; experimental vaccine; the Carnival Magic cruise ship off Cozumel, Mexico. Jessica McGowan/Getty; Mike Stone/Getty Images; Jim Young/Reuters/Landov; Steve Parsons/AP; Angel Castellanos/AP hide caption

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Jessica McGowan/Getty; Mike Stone/Getty Images; Jim Young/Reuters/Landov; Steve Parsons/AP; Angel Castellanos/AP

Nina Pham, shown here in a 2010 college yearbook photo, became infected with Ebola virus while caring for Thomas Eric Duncan in a Dallas hospital. Courtesy of tcu360.com/AP hide caption

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Courtesy of tcu360.com/AP

Thomas Eric Duncan died at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas Wednesday morning. He is the first person to have been diagnosed with Ebola in the United States. LM Otero/AP hide caption

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LM Otero/AP

A private security guard patrols the apartment building in Dallas where Ebola patient Thomas Duncan stayed. The family that hosted him is quarantined. Tom Pennington/Getty Images hide caption

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Tom Pennington/Getty Images

Young poets Monica Mendoza (clockwise from top left), Erica Sheppard McMath, Obasi Davis and Gabriel Cortez have written about how Type 2 diabetes affects their families and communities. Courtesy of The Bigger Picture hide caption

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Courtesy of The Bigger Picture