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The Level 1 adult trauma center will officially launch on May 1. Rob Hart/Courtesy of University of Chicago Medicine hide caption

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Rob Hart/Courtesy of University of Chicago Medicine

After Push From Activists, Chicago's South Side Gets An Adult Trauma Center

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Dr. Garen Wintemute at the University of California, Davis, Medical Center, says of the new authority given to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: "There's no funding. There's no agreement to provide funding. There isn't even encouragement." Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Protesters marched in London on Feb. 3 to demand more money for Britain's National Health Service, as winter conditions are thought to have put a severe strain on the system. Yui Mok/AP hide caption

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Yui Mok/AP

U.K. Hospitals Are Overburdened, But The British Love Their Universal Health Care

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Next month in the U.K., anyone at a major grocery store looking to buy a soft drink with more than 150 mg of caffeine per liter will need to present an ID. Stephane Grangier/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephane Grangier/Getty Images

Vapor from e-cigarettes contains toxins, although fewer than conventional cigarettes. mauro_grigollo/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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mauro_grigollo/Getty Images/iStockphoto

E-Cigarettes Likely Encourage Kids To Try Tobacco But May Help Adults Quit

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Patrick States slices into a venison steak at his home in Northglenn, Colo. Officials are asking hunters to have their kills tested before consuming the meat. Sam Brasch/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

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Sam Brasch/Colorado Public Radio

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention changed the topic of a nuclear strike preparedness session, opting to focus on a widespread flu outbreak. Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images

Proponents of medically supervised, indoor sites for opioid injection say such places would be much safer than tent encampments like this one — and could help people addicted to opioids transition into treatment and away from drug use. Natalie Piserchio for WHYY hide caption

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Natalie Piserchio for WHYY

Desperate Cities Consider 'Safe Injection' Sites For Opioid Users

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Five years ago, Avielle Richman, 6, was shot in her first-grade classroom at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn. Jeremy Richman/Courtesy Richman Family hide caption

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Jeremy Richman/Courtesy Richman Family

A Newtown Family's Campaign To Change How We Think About Violence

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Advertisements paid for by tobacco companies say their products are deadly and were manipulated to be more addictive. Tobacco Free Kids hide caption

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Tobacco Free Kids

In Ads, Tobacco Companies Admit They Made Cigarettes More Addictive

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