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A comprehensive study of air pollution in the U.S. finds it still kills thousands a year, and disproportionately affects poor people and minorities. Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images

U.S. Air Pollution Still Kills Thousands Every Year, Study Concludes

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Firearms using lead ammunition spray lead dust out of the muzzle and ejection port when fired. Herra Kuulapaa Precires/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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Herra Kuulapaa Precires/Science Photo Library/Getty Images
University of Washington

Life Expectancy Can Vary By 20 Years Depending On Where You Live

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Twins Ryan and Nell Stimpert lie in their baby boxes at home in Cleveland. The cardboard boxes are safe and portable places for the babies to sleep. Maddie McGarvey for NPR hide caption

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Maddie McGarvey for NPR

Jerusha Hodge is among the handful of CeaseFire outreach workers who work to curtail violence in three South Side Chicago neighborhoods. Hodge says shootings are down in the areas where CeaseFire has a presence. Cheryl Corley/NPR hide caption

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Cheryl Corley/NPR

Treat Gun Violence Like A Public Health Crisis, One Program Says

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The World Health Organization's finalists for the next director-general (from left): Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Sania Nishtar and David Nabarro Fabrice Coffrini and Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Fabrice Coffrini and Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images

Stanford bioengineering professor Manu Prakash looked to a children's toy to create a hand-powered centrifuge for processing blood tests. Kurt Hickman /Stanford University hide caption

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Kurt Hickman /Stanford University

Children's Whirligig Toy Inspires a Low-Cost Laboratory Test

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Third-year dental student Alex Dolbik checks the oral health of a patient at the Refugee Health Clinic in San Antonio. Wendy Rigby/Texas Public Radio hide caption

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Wendy Rigby/Texas Public Radio

In Texas, Students Help Provide Health Care For Refugees

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John Moore/Getty Images

A Stabbing, A Possible Ebola Outbreak, And A 'Time Bomb'

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While incarcerated, Mark Baskerville says he suffered five diabetic comas. He says he's now doing a better job of managing his health. Rae Ellen Bichell/NPR hide caption

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Rae Ellen Bichell/NPR

Helping Ex-Inmates Stay Out Of The ER Brings Multiple Benefits

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