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Young poets Monica Mendoza (clockwise from top left), Erica Sheppard McMath, Obasi Davis and Gabriel Cortez have written about how Type 2 diabetes affects their families and communities. Courtesy of The Bigger Picture hide caption

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Courtesy of The Bigger Picture

Television trucks converged on Mount Sinai Hospital in New York on Monday after it announced that it was screening a patient for Ebola virus. Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images

A member of Doctors Without Borders dons protective gear in Conakry, Guinea. U.S. health care workers will use similar protective garb. Cellou Binani/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Cellou Binani/AFP/Getty Images

Truvada has been around for a decade as a treatment for people who are already HIV-positive. In the last few years, it has also been shown to prevent new infections, and New York officials are embracing the pill as a way to prevent the spread of AIDS. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

As New York Embraces HIV-Preventing Pill, Some Voice Doubts

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Small but costly: Dozens of mosquito species carry West Nile virus in the U.S. Darren McCollester/Getty Images hide caption

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Darren McCollester/Getty Images

An ambulance makes its way through revelers in Cardiff city center in Wales in 2010. New measures in the city have reduced injuries caused by violence. Matt Cardy/Getty Images hide caption

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Matt Cardy/Getty Images

Differences in brain chemistry can affect an individual's likelihood of weight gain. Katherine Streeter for NPR hide caption

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

Calling Obesity A Disease May Make It Easier To Get Help

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A Thai medic checks bodies for forensic identity in Phang Nga province in southern of Thailand on Jan. 11, 2005. Thousands of people were killed in Thailand after a massive tsunami struck on Dec. 26, 2004. Pornchai Kittiwongsakul/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Pornchai Kittiwongsakul/AFP/Getty Images

After Disasters, DNA Science Is Helpful, But Often Too Pricey

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