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House Calls To The Homeless: A Doctor Treats Boston's Most Isolated Patients

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A child suffering from dengue fever lies in a bed in the isolation ward of a Rawalpindi, Pakistan, hospital in November 2013. There is no treatment for dengue, whose symptoms include fever, severe joint pain, headaches and bleeding. Muhammed Muheisen/AP hide caption

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Muhammed Muheisen/AP

Hard to resist. But if they're marijuana edibles, not such a treat. James A. Guilliam/Getty Images hide caption

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James A. Guilliam/Getty Images

When Pets Do Pot: A High That's Not So Mighty

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Officials cut off water to San Quentin State Prison in California to squelch an outbreak of Legionnaires' disease. Robert Galbraith/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Robert Galbraith/Reuters/Landov

Workers for the Safe Streets violence interruption project including Gardnel Carter, center, talk with Baltimore residents in 2010. Kenneth K. Lam/MCT via Getty Images hide caption

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Kenneth K. Lam/MCT via Getty Images

Crime Interrupts A Baltimore Doctor's Reform Efforts

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Leana Wen hands out awards to business owners for their efforts to support breastfeeding at the Baltimore City Health Department on Tuesday. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Can A 32-Year-Old Doctor Cure Baltimore's Ills?

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Louis Arevalo holds his Truvada pills at his home in Los Angeles. The drug can be over 90 percent effective at preventing spread of HIV. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News