public health public health

More than 30,000 people a year are killed by gun violence, including 50 killed near the Los Vegas strip last month where this makeshift memorial stands. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

What If We Treated Gun Violence Like A Public Health Crisis?

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Yaritza Martinez holds her son, Yariel, during a visit to Children's National Health System in Washington D.C. She was infected with the Zika virus while pregnant, but Yariel seems to be doing fine. Selena Simmons-Duffin/WAMU hide caption

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Selena Simmons-Duffin/WAMU

A Baby Exposed To Zika Virus Is Doing Well, One Year Later

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A algae bloom in Lake Erie contaminated the water supply for Toledo, Ohio, in August 2014. About 400,000 people were without useable water. The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Poll: Most Americans Think Their Own Group Faces Discrimination

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Screening for Type 2 diabetes involves a blood test, and if results are concerning a second test is recommended. ERproductions Ltd/Blend Images/Getty Images hide caption

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ERproductions Ltd/Blend Images/Getty Images

Flooding in Immokalee, Fla., after Hurricane Irma hit was still present days afterward. Public health officials say that even after waters recede, issues such as mold and mosquitos can remain. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Evacuees fill up cots at a shelter set up inside the George R. Brown Convention Center in Houston, Texas. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Health Issues Stack Up In Houston As Harvey Evacuees Seek Shelter

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Rosendo Gil, a family support worker with the Imperial County, Calif., home visiting program, has visited Blas Lopez and his fiancée Lluvia Padilla dozens of times since their daughter was born three years ago. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Overdoses from heroin and other opioids have led six states to declare public health emergencies. Marianne Williams/Getty Images hide caption

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Marianne Williams/Getty Images

From Alaska To Florida, States Respond To Opioid Crisis With Emergency Declarations

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At his golf club in Bedminster, N.J., on Thursday President Trump called the opioid epidemic a national emergency and said his administration was drawing up papers to make it official. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

What Could Happen If Trump Formally Declares Opioids A National Emergency

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After a briefing Tuesday on the opioid crisis, President Trump remarked on its severity but did not offer many specifics on tackling the problem. Two days later, he said his administration would declare a national emergency. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

Some States Say Declaring An Emergency Has Helped In The Opioid Fight

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