air pollution air pollution

Poland's second-largest city is also a major tourist destination. Krakow (seen here at night from the Krakus Mound) is suffering some of the worst air pollution in Europe. Arek Olek/Flickr hide caption

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Arek Olek/Flickr

Plagued By Smog, Krakow Struggles To Break Its Coal-Burning Habit

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A woman wears a face mask on a hazy January day in downtown Shanghai. China has ordered a popular anti-pollution film removed from major online outlets. In Xi'an, two people who had protested against smog were reportedly detained. ALY SONG/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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ALY SONG/Reuters /Landov

A lot of the airborne particles in the Earth's atmosphere come from natural sources, such as desert dust (red-orange) and sea salt (blue). But there's also soot from fires (green and yellow) and sulfur emissions (white) from burning fossil fuel. William Putman/ NASA/Goddard hide caption

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William Putman/ NASA/Goddard

Journalist Chai Jing used $160,000 of her own money to produce a documentary on China's air pollution problem. Screenshot/Under the Dome hide caption

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Screenshot/Under the Dome

The Anti-Pollution Documentary That's Taken China By Storm

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Smoke rises from chimneys of coal-based power plants in the Sonbhadra District of Uttar Pradesh, India. The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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The Washington Post/Getty Images

Young Indians Learn To Fight Pollution To Save Lives

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A jogger goes for a run amid heavy smog in Shanghai on Wednesday. China has for the first time agreed to limit its carbon emissions, but critics are questioning whether the move goes far enough. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

China Agrees To Pollution Limits, But Will It Make A Difference?

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Many people like these Tibetans in Qinghai, China, rely on indoor stoves for heating and cooking. That causes serious health problems. Courtesy of One Earth Designs hide caption

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Courtesy of One Earth Designs

Police were checking cars throughout Paris on Monday, including near the Arc de Triomphe, as the city tried to cut air pollution by instituting odd-even driving restrictions. Philippe Wojazer /Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Philippe Wojazer /Reuters /Landov

Headlamps make cold nights cozier, but leave the fuel-burning lanterns and stoves outside. Gopal Vijayaraghavan/Flickr hide caption

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Gopal Vijayaraghavan/Flickr