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Jack Dorsey

Mark Zuckerberg, chief executive officer of Facebook Inc., speaks virtually during a House Energy and Commerce Subcommittees hearing. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

5 Takeaways From Big Tech's Misinformation Hearing

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Google's Sundar Pichai, Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg and Twitter's Jack Dorsey face Congressional scrutiny over the spread of misinformation on their platforms. Michael Reynolds-Pool/Getty Images/Composite by NPR hide caption

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Michael Reynolds-Pool/Getty Images/Composite by NPR

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey testifies remotely during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing about how social media companies handled election misinformation. Hannah McKay-Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Hannah McKay-Pool/Getty Images

Facebook And Twitter Defend Election Policies To Skeptical Senators

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Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey testifies remotely during a Senate Commerce Committee hearing Wednesday about reforms to Section 230, a key legal shield for tech companies. Greg Nash/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Greg Nash/Pool/Getty Images

Days Before Election, Tech CEOs Defend Themselves From GOP Accusations Of Censorship

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Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey, Google CEO Sundar Pichai, and Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg will testify on Wednesday before the Senate Commerce Committee about a legal shield known as Section 230. Jose Luis Magana, LM Otero, Jens Meyer/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana, LM Otero, Jens Meyer/AP

Facebook, Twitter, Google CEOs Testify To Senate: What To Watch For

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Jack Dorsey's dual roles as CEO of Twitter and Square is drawing pressure from an activist investor, which is pushing for changes at the social media company. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Jack Dorsey, Twitter's Eccentric CEO, Could Be Looking For A Job Soon

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Twitter will stop running political ads, CEO Jack Dorsey announced Wednesday. Online political ads pose "significant risks to politics," he tweeted. Denis Charlet/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Denis Charlet/AFP/Getty Images

Twitter To Halt Political Ads, In Contrast To Facebook

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An MIT study tracked 126,000 stories and found that false ones were 70 percent more likely to be retweeted than ones that were true. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

Can You Believe It? On Twitter, False Stories Are Shared More Widely Than True Ones

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Milo Yiannopoulos, a conservative writer and Internet personality, holds a news conference down the street from the Pulse nightclub in Orlando, Fla., last month. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images