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The historic Jackson Magnolia, planted on the south grounds of the White House, was trimmed back on Wednesday. The tree is in poor health, needs artificial support and is in danger of falling. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Portions Of Ailing White House Magnolia Removed Over Safety Concerns

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The Sardar Sweet Shop in Varanasi, India, was built around a neem tree considered too holy to cut down. Customers flow in and out, barely noticing the imposing tree. In rural parts, people use the neem tree's leaves to repel insects, the sap for stomach pain and the branches to brush their teeth. As for the candy shop sweets, Diane Cook says they were "fabulous." Diane Cook and Len Jenshel hide caption

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Diane Cook and Len Jenshel

Chris Morris, an experienced back country skier, cuts back in a glade on Lyon Mountain in upstate New York. Brian Mann/NCPR hide caption

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Brian Mann/NCPR

A Winter's Storm In March Means A Morning Skiing The Glades

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Giant sequoias in the Sierra Nevada range can grow to be 250 feet tall — or more. John Buie/Flickr hide caption

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John Buie/Flickr

How Is A 1,600-Year-Old Tree Weathering California's Drought?

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The Rawlings plant in Dolgeville, N.Y., makes about 300,000 bats a year and employs about 40 people. Brian Mann/North Country Public Radio hide caption

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Brian Mann/North Country Public Radio

A Beetle May Soon Strike Out Baseball's Famous Ash Bats

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A photo taken in 2005 shows the Hawai'i Island rainforest before it succumbed to Rapid 'ōhi'a Death. J.B. Friday/University of Hawai'i/J.B. Friday/University of Hawai'i hide caption

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J.B. Friday/University of Hawai'i/J.B. Friday/University of Hawai'i

Rapid 'Ōhi'a Death: The Disease That's Killing Native Hawaiian Trees

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This is the tallest known American chestnut tree in North America, clocking in at precisely 115 feet. It's an exciting find for those seeking to eventually restore the tree to its previous habitat. Susan Sharon/MPBN hide caption

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Susan Sharon/MPBN

In The Maine Woods, A Towering Giant Could Help Save Chestnuts

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To: MelbourneElm22; Subject: My Dog Peed On You Today; Body: (◕︵◕)

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A morning's berry harvest from West Philadelphia's Ogden Orchard includes raspberries, gooseberries, currants, goumis and mulberries. Courtesy of Philadelphia Orchard Project hide caption

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Courtesy of Philadelphia Orchard Project

Callery pear trees in Pittsburgh. The smell of the invasive trees has been compared to rotting fish and other stinky things. Luke H. Gordon/Flickr hide caption

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Luke H. Gordon/Flickr

What's That Smell? The Beautiful Tree That's Causing Quite A Stink

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Marcello Mazzucchi, a retired forest ranger, stands in the Fiemme Valley in the Italian Alps. Renaissance luthiers such as Antonio Stradivari came here to handpick trees that would be crafted into the world's finest instruments. Graziano Panfili for NPR hide caption

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Graziano Panfili for NPR

In The Italian Alps, Stradivari's Trees Live On

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Maria Benech of the U.S. Forest Service surveys a severely burned patch of forest. Almost 40 percent of the burned area looks similar. Lauren Sommer/KQED hide caption

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Lauren Sommer/KQED

One Year After Calif. Rim Fire, Debate Simmers Over Forest Recovery

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Visitors have flocked to the Angel Oak tree just outside Charleston, S.C., for generations. A local group has until late November to raise funds to buy a parcel of land that they say is needed to protect the live oak from development. Randall Hill/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Randall Hill/Reuters/Landov

Guerrilla grafter Tara Hui grafts a fruiting pear branch onto an ornamental fruit tree in the San Francisco Bay Area. She doesn't want the location known because the grafting is illegal. Lonny Shavelson for NPR hide caption

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Lonny Shavelson for NPR