trees trees
Stories About

trees

Some cottonwood trees are home to microorganisms that are known methane producers. Sean Bagshaw/Science Source/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Sean Bagshaw/Science Source/Getty Images

Getting Fire From A Tree Without Burning The Wood

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/727976646/733081727" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The historic Jackson Magnolia, planted on the south grounds of the White House, was trimmed back on Wednesday. The tree is in poor health, needs artificial support and is in danger of falling. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Harnik/AP

The Sardar Sweet Shop in Varanasi, India, was built around a neem tree considered too holy to cut down. Customers flow in and out, barely noticing the imposing tree. In rural parts, people use the neem tree's leaves to repel insects, the sap for stomach pain and the branches to brush their teeth. As for the candy shop sweets, Diane Cook says they were "fabulous." Diane Cook and Len Jenshel hide caption

toggle caption
Diane Cook and Len Jenshel

Giant sequoias in the Sierra Nevada range can grow to be 250 feet tall — or more. John Buie/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption
John Buie/Flickr

How Is A 1,600-Year-Old Tree Weathering California's Drought?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/499453623/499637494" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Rawlings plant in Dolgeville, N.Y., makes about 300,000 bats a year and employs about 40 people. Brian Mann/North Country Public Radio hide caption

toggle caption
Brian Mann/North Country Public Radio

A photo taken in 2005 shows the Hawai'i Island rainforest before it succumbed to Rapid 'ōhi'a Death. J.B. Friday/University of Hawai'i/J.B. Friday/University of Hawai'i hide caption

toggle caption
J.B. Friday/University of Hawai'i/J.B. Friday/University of Hawai'i

This is the tallest known American chestnut tree in North America, clocking in at precisely 115 feet. It's an exciting find for those seeking to eventually restore the tree to its previous habitat. Susan Sharon/MPBN hide caption

toggle caption
Susan Sharon/MPBN